Greek Ethical Thought from Homer to the Stoics

By Hilda D. Oakeley | Go to book overview

BACCHYLIDES
PROBABLY 507-428 B.C.

The Odes of Bacchylides, celebrating victories in the Great Athletic Contests of Greece, are characterised by the moral reflections he introduces from time to time.


The Glory of Virtue

ODES OF VICTORY i. 48-74. From Jebb's Edition of the Poems and Fragments of Bacchylides, Greek and English.

The best glory is that of Virtue, so deem I now and ever: wealth may dwell with men of little worth, and will exalt the spirit; but he who is bountiful to the gods can cheer his heart with a loftier hope. If a mortal is blessed with health, and can live on his own substance, he vies with the most fortunate. Joy attends on every state of life, if only disease and helpless poverty be not there. The rich man yearns for great things as the poorer for less; mortals find no sweetness in opulence, but are ever pursuing visions that flee before them. He whose mind is blown about by ambitions light as air, wins honour only for his lifetime. The task of virtue is toilsome; but when it has been duly wrought to the end, it leaves the enviable meed of bright renown, outlasting death.


Many Paths to Renown

ODES OF VICTORY iii. 35-52.

Men seek various paths which they shall tread to the winning of bright renown. And countless are the kinds of human knowledge. A man is rich in golden hope because he has wisdom, or has been honoured with the gifts of the

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Greek Ethical Thought from Homer to the Stoics
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Introduction vii
  • Contents xxxix
  • Greek Ethical Thought 1
  • Theognis - 565-490 B.C. 15
  • Simonides - 556-467 B.C. 17
  • Bacchylides - Probably 507-428 B.C. 18
  • Aeschylus - 525-456 B.C. 20
  • Sophocles - 495-406 B.C. 26
  • Euripides - 480-406 B.C. 29
  • Anaximander of Miletus 33
  • Philolaus - Fifth Century B.C. 33
  • Democritus of Abdera 36
  • Thucydides - 460-400 B.C. 39
  • Xenophon's "Memorabilia" 46
  • Plato - 427-347 B.C. 52
  • Aristotle - 384-322 B.C. 142
  • Epicurus - 342-270 B.C. 190
  • The Stoics - The First Heads of the Stoa 199
  • Epictetus - About A.D. 50 to A.D. 130 209
  • The Thoughts Of Marcus Aurelius Antoninus - Born A.D. 121. Emperor A.D. 161. Died A.D. 180 216
  • Index of Authors, Works, And Chief Ethical Subjects 223
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