Greek Ethical Thought from Homer to the Stoics

By Hilda D. Oakeley | Go to book overview

DEMOCRITUS OF ABDERA

Probably born about 460 B.C., said to have lived to a great age. Democritus, after Leucippus founded the Atomist philosophy, appears to have developed also ethical views, in which Epicurus followed him as well as in his materialistic system.

DIELS 3.

(163.) He who wishes to have a contented mind must not engage in many occupations, neither private nor public, nor in what he undertakes strive beyond his powers and nature; but he should be so watchful over himself that even when good fortune visits him and appears to raise him to the skies he does not regard it, and does not grasp what is beyond his power. For a moderate filling up (of the cup) is safer than an overflow.

4.

(34.) Democritus in his work on the end said that it was contentment which he called a stable state. And he often said that pleasure and pain is the criterion (of what is beneficial and not beneficial).


Sayings of Democritus

DIELS 40.

(15.) Neither physical strength nor money gives happiness to men, but right thiking and variety of thought.

43.

(99.) Repentance for base actions is the salvation of life.

45.

(48.) He who commits a wrong is more miserable than he who is wqronged.

-36-

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Greek Ethical Thought from Homer to the Stoics
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Introduction vii
  • Contents xxxix
  • Greek Ethical Thought 1
  • Theognis - 565-490 B.C. 15
  • Simonides - 556-467 B.C. 17
  • Bacchylides - Probably 507-428 B.C. 18
  • Aeschylus - 525-456 B.C. 20
  • Sophocles - 495-406 B.C. 26
  • Euripides - 480-406 B.C. 29
  • Anaximander of Miletus 33
  • Philolaus - Fifth Century B.C. 33
  • Democritus of Abdera 36
  • Thucydides - 460-400 B.C. 39
  • Xenophon's "Memorabilia" 46
  • Plato - 427-347 B.C. 52
  • Aristotle - 384-322 B.C. 142
  • Epicurus - 342-270 B.C. 190
  • The Stoics - The First Heads of the Stoa 199
  • Epictetus - About A.D. 50 to A.D. 130 209
  • The Thoughts Of Marcus Aurelius Antoninus - Born A.D. 121. Emperor A.D. 161. Died A.D. 180 216
  • Index of Authors, Works, And Chief Ethical Subjects 223
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