Greek Ethical Thought from Homer to the Stoics

By Hilda D. Oakeley | Go to book overview

EPICTETUS
ABOUT A.D. 50 TO A.D. 130

A slave, freed after the death of Nero, A.D. 68. Expelled from Rome with other philosophers by Domitian, A.D. 89, he went to Nicopolis, and lectured there till his death. His addresses were recorded by Arrian, who heard him. He is almost unknown except from his writings, which show him, as Mr. P. E. Matheson says (from Bonhöffer) in the Introduction to his translation of Epictetus' Discourses and Manual, to be a Stoic of the old school.

Chapter 1. Text: Epicteti Dissertationes, Heinrich Schenkl; Enchiridion (Manual), J. Schweighaeuser (Teubner). Translation: P. E. Matheson.


MANUAL

Of all existing things, some are in our power, and others are not in our power. In our power are thought, impulse, will to get and will to avoid, and, in a word, everything which is our own doing. Things not in our power include the body, property, reputation, office, and, in a word, everything which is not our own doing. Things in our power are by nature free, unhindered, untrammelled; things not in our power are weak, servile, subject to hindrance, dependent on others. Remember, then, that if you imagine that what is naturally slavish is free, and what is naturally another's is your own, you will be hampered, you will mourn, you will be put to confusion, you will blame gods and men; but it you think that only your own belongs to you, and that what is another's is indeed another's, no one will ever put compulsion or hindrance on you; you will blame none, you will accuse none, you will do nothing against your will; no one will harm you, you will have no enemy, for no harm can touch you.

-209-

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Greek Ethical Thought from Homer to the Stoics
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Introduction vii
  • Contents xxxix
  • Greek Ethical Thought 1
  • Theognis - 565-490 B.C. 15
  • Simonides - 556-467 B.C. 17
  • Bacchylides - Probably 507-428 B.C. 18
  • Aeschylus - 525-456 B.C. 20
  • Sophocles - 495-406 B.C. 26
  • Euripides - 480-406 B.C. 29
  • Anaximander of Miletus 33
  • Philolaus - Fifth Century B.C. 33
  • Democritus of Abdera 36
  • Thucydides - 460-400 B.C. 39
  • Xenophon's "Memorabilia" 46
  • Plato - 427-347 B.C. 52
  • Aristotle - 384-322 B.C. 142
  • Epicurus - 342-270 B.C. 190
  • The Stoics - The First Heads of the Stoa 199
  • Epictetus - About A.D. 50 to A.D. 130 209
  • The Thoughts Of Marcus Aurelius Antoninus - Born A.D. 121. Emperor A.D. 161. Died A.D. 180 216
  • Index of Authors, Works, And Chief Ethical Subjects 223
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