The Gulf War and the New World Order: International Relations of the Middle East

By Tareq Y. Ismael; Jacqueline S. Ismael | Go to book overview

there. Notwithstanding the obstacles already mentioned, there is probably a greater readiness among the Lebanese to invest in Lebanon than there is among Syrians to invest in Syria. Despite Syrian overlordship, political pressures are likely to be more mediated and indirect than in Syria proper, and the private sector's legal framework provides quite different business opportunities than those available even with the latest laws in Syria. If ever the reemergence of a strong private sector on Lebanese soil should imperil the position of the Syrian regime, these dangers could be warded off more easily due to the continuous formal distinction between the two countries. This distinction at present enables the Asad regime to dominate Lebanon and, at the same time, minimizes Lebanese claims to enfranchisement.

One of the major issues of debate among the ruling circles of Syria will certainly be the ways in which the strengthening of private capital, be it domestic or external, can be reconciled with the privileges and survival of the regime. But as the rulers do not intend to cut back on their ambitions, they will make every possible effort to tap external resources and integrate themselves into the new world order. Their choices in the Kuwait crisis facilitated this policy, but were its result rather than its cause.


Notes
1.
For an eloquent exposition of this convergence of systems through the collapse of one of these systems, see F. Halliday, "The Ends of Cold War," in New Left Review 180 ( March-April 1990): 5-24. If such a convergence of systems is the outcome of the end of the cold war this need not, as Halliday suggests, imply that the cold war was a conflict between systems. Cf. M. Kaldor, "After the Cold War," in New Left Review 180 ( March- April 1990): 25-40.
2.
George Bush, "Address to Congress, 11 September 1990," in The New York Times ( 12 September 1990).
3.
For a detailed chronology of events see The Middle East Journal1-3 ( 1991).
4.
For example, interview with the commander of Syrian forces in Saudi Arabia, 'Ali Habib, with al-Khalij ( 7 October 1990); also in Washington Post ( 12 November 1990); Tishrin ( 15-17 November 1990 and 12-14 January 1991).
5.
For details, see Middle East International ( 22 March 1991): 9, 10.

-395-

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The Gulf War and the New World Order: International Relations of the Middle East
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Introduction 1
  • Part I - The Gulf War and the International Order 23
  • 1 - Reflections on the Gulf War Experience 25
  • Notes 38
  • 2 - The United Nations in the Gulf War 50
  • 3 - Bush's New World Order 52
  • Notes 73
  • Notes 74
  • 4 - The European Community's Middle Eastern Policy 107
  • 5 - Regional Cooperation and Security in the Middle East the Role of the European Community 116
  • Notes 129
  • 6 - Japan 132
  • References 148
  • Part II - The United States and the New World Order 151
  • 7 - Between Theory and Fact 153
  • Notes 174
  • 8 - The New World Order and the Gulf War 184
  • Notes 217
  • 9 - The Making of the New World Order 240
  • 10 - Defeating the Vietnam Syndrome 242
  • Notes 258
  • Part III - The Gulf War and the Middle East Order 263
  • 11 - Iraq and the New World Order 290
  • 12 - Iran and the New World Order 313
  • 13 - The Gulf War, the Palestinians, and the New World Order 339
  • 14 - Israel and the New World Order 347
  • Notes 363
  • 15 - Jordan and the Gulf War 381
  • 16 - Syria, the Kuwait War, and the New World Order 395
  • 17 - Imagining Egypt in the New Age 399
  • Notes 430
  • 18 - Turkey, the Gulf Crisis, and the New World Order 446
  • Part IV - Political Trends and Cultural Patterns 449
  • 19 - The Middle East in the New World Order 451
  • Acknowledgments 468
  • Acknowledgments 469
  • 20 - Islam, Democracy, and the Arab Future 473
  • Acknowledgments 497
  • Notes 497
  • 21 - Islam at War and Communism in Retreat What is the Connection? 502
  • Acknowledgments 520
  • Notes 520
  • 22 - Global Apartheid? 521
  • Notes 535
  • 23 - Democracy Died at the Gulf 548
  • Contributors 549
  • Index 554
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