Subject to Change: Guerrilla Television Revisited

By Deirdre Boyle | Go to book overview

6.
Four More Years
Thrilled with their sudden prestige among the press corps, TVTV returned to Miami in August to cover the Republican Convention. The group quickly discovered the Republicans were as controlled as the Democrats were disorganized. This made the job much easier, especially since the media inadvertently had been handed the Republicans' minute-by-minute script of the Convention, including all the "spontaneous demonstrations" held by the Young Republicans. The story at the Republican Convention was not about a fight for the nomination (since Nixon's anointing was a foregone conclusion), but about the clash of styles and values espoused by the people inside the convention hall and those outside. TVTV covered Young Republican rallies, cocktail parties, antiwar demonstrations, and the "scheduled" frenzy of the convention floor. Posted in the living room of their Pine Tree Drive headquarters was the following reminder
The Big Stories
1. The Underbelly of Broadcast TV
2. The Vietnam vets
3. Those zany Republicans, young and old
4. The White House family/celebrities

Are you on a big story? Does your big story connect with the others? Is your Little story part of the big picture?

The Management 1

Once again aiming their cameras away from the podium and into the crowd, TVTV produced Four More Years, an amazingly coherent and exhaustive chronicle of the convention. From the Nixonettes to the Vietnam Vets, from the ego-driven media stars to the power- hungry political czars, the characters included in Four More Years provided a complex portrait of America poised at a moment when a

-55-

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