Subject to Change: Guerrilla Television Revisited

By Deirdre Boyle | Go to book overview

16.
Super Video

In the fall of 1975 TVTV was working on several projects simultaneously and had to hire two people to help with the work: Karen Murphy as secretary and Steven Conant as equipment manager. The staff was earning $150 a week while the seven partners pulled salaries of $175. With investors like the Point Foundation, the Vanguard Foundation, and family members, TVTV was able to meet their basic operating costs of $10,000 to $12,000 a month. They owned $26,000 in equipment, which included three color cameras, a portapak camera with a low-light tube, a brand new three-quarter-inch cassette editor and various portable decks, cassette recorders, editors, playback machines, and monitors. 1

No longer a small group, TVTV began to experience problems associated with their growth. Hudson Marquez complained:

It used to be four people with some other people. Decisions were real easy to make. We knew each other so well through tape, and we knew ourselves. It was non-verbal. We could do it blind-folded. We were very tight. We had no money, just ideas. We used to run the whole scene. Now we have people to do the typing. And there is creeping democracy. Now to make decisions, we have to have two-hour meetings. 2

Some people wanted to do hard journalism, others soft journalism, and still others nonfiction. Rucker explained that they were afraid they were becoming too serious and locked into a professionalism that lacked innovation. It was dedication to experimentation that linked the group together as TVTV turned a difficult transitional corner. 3

To accommodate the diversity of the group, TVTV members decided the next step was to go off in different directions. Some people were working on "Super Vision," an original 90-minute drama which offered a retrospective history of broadcasting from the vantage of the year 1999. Others were developing new PBS proposals. In addi

-158-

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Subject to Change: Guerrilla Television Revisited
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Introduction xiii
  • Contents xvii
  • I. Underground Video 3
  • 2. Subject to Change 14
  • 3. Guerrilla Versus Grassroots 26
  • 4. the World's Largest Tv Studio 36
  • 5. Mountain Guerrilla 48
  • 6. Four More Years 55
  • 7. Communitube 65
  • 8. Gaga Over Guru 72
  • 9. Prime Time Tvtv 89
  • 10. Broadside Tv 96
  • Ii. Impeaching Evidence 105
  • 12. Changing Channels 116
  • 13. Furor Over Fugitive 128
  • 14. Living Newsletter? 139
  • 15. the Good Times Are Killing Me 146
  • 16. Super Video 158
  • 17. Intermedia 165
  • 18. Hooray for Hollywood? 172
  • 19. the Big Chill 183
  • 20. Epilogue 190
  • Appendix Information on Apes by Broadside Tv, University Community Video, and Tvtv (top Value Television 209
  • Notes 223
  • Bibliography 259
  • Index 271
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