SCENE XII. -- CÆSAR'S Camp in Egypt.

Enter CÆSAR, DOLABELLA, THYREUS, and others.

Cæs. Let him appear that's come from Antony. --
Know you him?

Dol Cæsar, 'tis his schoolmaster:
An argument that he is pluck'd, when hither
He sends so poor a pinion of his wing,
Which had superfluous kings for messengers
Not many moons gone by.

Enter EUPHRONIUS.

Cæs. Approach, and speak.

Euph. Such as I am, I come from Antony:
I was of late as petty to his ends
As is the morn-dew on the myrtle-leaf
To the grand sea.1

Cæs. Be't so: declare thine office.

Euph. Lord of his fortunes he salutes thee, and
Requires2 to live in Egypt: which not granted,
He lessens his requests; and to thee sues
To let him breathe between the heavens and earth,
A private man in Athens: this for him.
Next, Cleopatra does confess thy greatness;
Submits her to thy might; and of thee craves
The circle3 of the Ptolemies for her heirs,
Now hazarded to thy Grace.

____________________
1
In "to his ends" and "To the sea," to has the force of compared to, or
in comparison with. A very frequent usage.
2
To require and to request were formerly synonymous.
3
The circle here is the crown or diadem.

-128-

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