Violence against the Press: Policing the Public Sphere in U.S. History

By John Nerone | Go to book overview

Notes

Chapter One
1.
Edwin McDowell, "Book Notes: A Canceled Contract," New York Times, 19 July 1989, p. C20; V. M., "Collins Cancels 'Rushdie Dossier,'" Publishers' Weekly 19 May 1989. Publishers' Weekly reports that "Collins CEO Socia Land and Barry Winkleman, newly appointed managing director of the general division, disagreed with the book's editors at Fontana that it had attained the promised objectivity." There was also pressure within the British publishing industry to let the Rushdie controversy die a natural death. Subsequently, both books were published, though by different houses. Daniel Pipes, The Rushdie Affair: The Novel, the Ayatollah, and the West ( New York: Carol Publishing, 1990); Lisa Appignanesi and Sara Maitland, eds., The Rushdie File ( Syracuse: Syracuse University Press, 1990). Ironically, Pipes is rather critical of Rushdie and his writing, even while condemning Khomeini's edict.
2.
Salman Rushdie, "Is Nothing Sacred?" in Rushdie, Imaginary Homelands: Essays and Criticism, 1981-1991 ( New York: Viking, 1991), pp. 416, 420.
3.
Satanic Verses is a novel about the postcolonial experience of Indians and Pakistanis, among other things; it was unfair to Rushdie that his work would seem to many to be just another colonialist humiliation.
4.
The following discussion is drawn from Jürgen Habermas, The Structural Transformation of the Public Sphere: An Inquiry into a Category of Bourgeois Society, Thomas Burger , trans. ( Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 1989).
5.
This is not to say that law is lax, only that it seems lax to most people. To mention only the most familiar legal restrictions on expression is to compose a long list: obscenity and indecency; sedition and treason; incitement; libel, slander, and defamation; patent and copyright; and immigration regulation. In addition, there are numerous governmental and procedural restrictions on the flow of information that are justified by national security, and the range of secrecy continues to grow.
6.
Alexis de Tocqueville, Democracy in America, ed. J. P. Mayer ( Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday, 1969), chap. 15, "The Unlimited Power of the Majority in the United States."
7.
All documented in Ben Bagdikian, The Media Monopoly, 2d ed. ( Boston: Beacon Press, 1987). See also Bagdikian, "The U.S. Media: Supermarket or Assembly Line?" Journal of Communication 35 ( 1985): 97-109, along with the dissenting view in Benjamin Compaine , "The Expanding Base of Media Competition," ibid., pp. 81-96.

-231-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Violence against the Press: Policing the Public Sphere in U.S. History
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments v
  • Contents vii
  • 1 - Introduction 3
  • 2 - The Press and the American Revolution 18
  • Conclusion 50
  • 3 - Antipress Violence and Politics in the Early Republic 53
  • 4 - The Crusade Against Abolitionism 84
  • Conclusion 110
  • 5 - The Civil War and Civil Liberties 111
  • Conclusion 126
  • 6 - Violence and Minority Media 128
  • Conclusion 163
  • 7 - Labor-Related Violence 165
  • Conclusion 195
  • 8 - Recent Violence Against the Mainstream Press 196
  • Conclusion 211
  • 9 - Conclusion 213
  • Appendix A - Survey Questionnaire 219
  • Appendix B - The Flow of Antiabolitionist Violence 221
  • Notes 231
  • Index 293
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 312

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.