The Politics of Unreason: Right Wing Extremism in America, 1790-1970

By Seymour Martin Lipset; Earl Raab | Go to book overview

Corporation, assisted us in obtaining the cards from an ORC 1968 pre- election survey made on behalf of the Columbia Broadcasting Corporation, which contained a number of issue items. Daniel Yankelovich gave us the IBM cards containing the data collected from his 1968 national sample of college students, gathered for Fortune magazine, which included items on presidential choices. Philip Hastings, director of the Roper Public Opinion Research Center at Williams College, provided us with duplicate cards from a large number of surveys dealing with attitudes toward Father Coughlin, Senator Joseph McCarthy, and the John Birch Society, which had been collected since 1935 by different survey organizations. The relevant results of the secondary analyses of these studies are included in the appropriate chapters here. We are naturally extremely grateful to all of them, as well as to the sponsors of the studies we have used.

Many of our friends and colleagues helped us greatly through reading drafts of various chapters or the entire book, and suggesting ways we could improve them. Among these are Daniel Bell, Frank Freidel, Nathan Glazer, Paul Weaver, and James Q. Wilson of Harvard University, Charles Y. Glock, Gertrude Selznick, and Neil Smelser of the University of California at Berkeley, Morton Keller of Brandeis University, Richard Hofstadter of Columbia University, William Chambers of Washington University at St. Louis, and Everett Ladd of the University of Connecticut.

Last, but as we well know far from least, we must state our gratitude to our two aides who were really the most indispensable contributors to turning this into a publishable book. They are Margot Katz of San Francisco, and Mrs. Meena Vohra of Cambridge.

-- SEYMOUR MARTIN LIPSET
EARL RAAB
Belmont, Massachusetts
San Francisco, California


Notes
1.
S. M. Lipset, "The Radical Right," British Journal of Sociology, I (June 1955), pp. 176-209; also published in slightly revised form as "The Sources of the 'Radical Right,'" in Daniel Bell, ed., The New American Right (New York: Criterion Books, 1955), pp. 166-233. See also in the same book, Nathan Glazer and S. M. Lipset, "The Polls on Communism and Conformity," pp. 141-165.
2.
Earl Raab and Seymour M. Lipset, Prejudice and Society (New York: Anti-Defamation League, 1959).
3.
Ibid., p. 9.
4.
Major Social Problems (Evanston: Row, Peterson, 1959), pp. 173-236; Major Social Problems (New York: Harper & Row, 1964), pp. 173-234.

-xxiii-

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The Politics of Unreason: Right Wing Extremism in America, 1790-1970
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Tables ix
  • Preface xv
  • Notes xxiii
  • Chapter 1 Political Extremism 3
  • Notes 31
  • Chapter 2 Before the Civil War 34
  • Notes 67
  • Chapter 3 the Protestant Crusades from the Civil War to World War I 72
  • Notes 104
  • Chapter 4 the Bigoted Twenties 110
  • Notes 145
  • Chapter 5 the 1930's: Extremism of the Depression 150
  • Notes 202
  • Chapter 6 the 1950's: Mccarthyism 209
  • Notes 245
  • Chapter 7 the Era of the John Birch Society 248
  • Notes 282
  • Chapter 8 the Birch Society and Its Contemporaries: Social Base 288
  • Notes 333
  • Chapter 9 George Wallace and the New Nativism 338
  • Notes 373
  • Chapter 10 George Wallace: the Election and the Electorate 378
  • Notes 424
  • Chapter 11 Extremists and Extremism 428
  • Notes 482
  • Chapter 12 Political Extremism: Past and Future 484
  • Notes 515
  • Methodological Appendix to Chapter 11 517
  • Notes 522
  • General Index 525
  • Index of Proper Names 537
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