The Politics of Unreason: Right Wing Extremism in America, 1790-1970

By Seymour Martin Lipset; Earl Raab | Go to book overview

tools are internationalists, World Federalists, international bankers, Communists, Zionists, and integrationists.

Many other writers and right-wing publications have focused directly on the Jew as the anti-Christ and the source of the conspiracy which is undermining America and Christian civilization. The plot of the Elders of Zion is taken literally, and Communism is described as a totally Jewish-controlled movement.

Particular emphasis is placed on desegregation by these writers, since they feel that mongrelization of the white race is now taking place. The conspiracy theorists stress that integration and mongrelization (the latter always follows the former) are old Jewish tricks. The Jew, they argue, was able to destroy the Roman Empire by this method. The Jew realizes that racial purity, Christian morality and patriotism are synonymous, and deceitfully preaches equality so that the races will be thrown together. 137

Similar positions are taken by Gerald L. K. Smith in his monthly magazine, The Cross and The Flag, and by the National States Rights party, formed in the spring of 1958, as a union of a number of splinter extremist parties. Anti-Semitism has been "the most constant theme" in Smith's propaganda. 138 He also sees the country as the victim of complex conspiracies. "The twins of the anti-Christ, Zionism and Communism, are seeking to destroy not only the foreground of our tradition, but the background of our tradition." 139 The Thunderbolt, the organ of the States Rights party, has argued that the FBI is a major part of the conspiracy: "The FBI stands for the 'civil rights' of a nigger to rape your wife, daughter or sister. To be effective, a conspiracy must camouflage itself and its true purpose and pretend to be the opposite of what it really is. That is the method of J. Edgar Hoover, the Master of Deceit, and the Communist- Jewish Conspiracy which placed him at the head of the FBI." 140

These different organizational strains of right-wing extremism--the economic ultraconservatism of the Birch Society, the Protestant fundamentalism of Hargis and McIntire, and the overt racism of the KKK--reflected, as might be expected, different kinds of constituencies. All, however, were to come together in George Wallace's campaign for the Presidency in 1968.


Notes
1.
Robert Welch, The Blue Book (Belmont: Robert Welch, Inc., 1961), p. 108.
2.
Robert Welch, The New Americanism ( Boston: Western Islands, 1966), p. 4.
3.
E. Merrill Root, "Our Frontier," American Opinion, XI ( October 1968), 31.

-282-

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