Discrimination Against Women A Global Survey of the Economic, Educational, Social and Political Status of Women

By Eschel M. Rhoodie | Go to book overview
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31. Data: Guide to Information Sources
Sources of information are presented in the following order:
1. An overview of the availability of source material and gaps in our information about women's progress towards equality.
2. Studies, reports, and surveys which are concerned with several countries at a time, in different continents, or which present information on women in an international context.
3. Sources on women in Europe.
4. The Communist East Bloc.
5. Asia.
6. Africa.
7. Latin America.
8. The Arab-Muslim World.
9. The United States.
10. Law and scientific journals and newspapers which have been consulted in preparation of the manuscript for this book and which, regularly, contain articles about women's status and women's rights.

1. Overview . There is a wealth of recently published material ( 1975-1987) on the progress, or lack of progress, made during the United Nations Decade for Women and which started off with the world conference in Mexico in 1975. Several books have been published by major research institutes, detailing the status of women in 1975 and comparing their situation with the circumstances of 1985 and by individual economists, sociologists, and political scientists. There have been numerous articles on women's rights published in the press and, by more qualified observers, in scientific journals.

Many surveys and investigations have been completed by individual governments and by states, within federations and unions, by law commissions and by women's organizations.

International organizations, and the United Nations itself, have also produced a significant volume of material dealing either with discrimination against women, the status of women in several different fields such as health, education, economic development or with the progress made by member states in the elimination of discrimination during the past decade. The weakness of official reports is the fact that the United Nations has no option but to accept at face value the records filed by member states. Perhaps only a third of those reports are reasonably accurate and objective.

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