Zoltaan Kodaaly; His Life and Work

By Lászlό EŐsze | Go to book overview

KODÁLY'S LIFE

As a composer and one of the founders of Modern Hungarian music, Kodály's place in the annals of music is already established by such outstanding works as the Psalmus Hungaricus, Háry János, the Spinning-Room, Dances of Marosszèk and Dances of Galánta, the Te Deum of Budavár, The Peacock, and his Concerto and Missa Brevis. As a musicologist, his collection and classification of Hungarian folk songs, his comprehensive work, The Folk Music of Hungary, and innumerable papers on various aspects of folklore have earned for him the gratitude of scientists throughout the world as one of the leading twentieth-century authorities. As a teacher, his training of several generations of Hungarian composers, and his work in reorganizing the teaching of music in schools and in developing a flourishing school of choral singing, have established his right to the appreciation and gratitude of his country as one of the most far-sighted engineers of Hungarian cultural policy.

What is it, then, that has enabled him to accomplish single-handed a three-fold task which one might surely have expected to absorb the energies of three men? Apart from his precocious talent and the variety of his interests, the answer is to be found in his deep love for his country and its people. This it is, above all, that has given him the force to carry through an undertaking that has often demanded superhuman efforts; though undoubtedly the circumstances of his education, the influences of his home and early environment, have also played their part. The first eighteen years of his life, the years when mind and character are at their most receptive, were spent in the Hungarian countryside, and the impressions he then received have exerted their influence throughout his career.


The Years of Preparation (1882-1905)

His father, Frigyes Kodály ( 1853-1926), was a railway official--a plump, reticent man of medium height, who soon won the respect of his colleagues and superiors by his honesty and efficiency. He entered the service in 1870, and by 1883 had already been promoted to the rank of station-master, in which position he continued until his retirement at the end of 1910. His life was a

-11-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Zoltaan Kodaaly; His Life and Work
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 186

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.