Zoltaan Kodaaly; His Life and Work

By Lászlό EŐsze | Go to book overview

BY WAY OF EPILOGUE

Throughout this book we have endeavoured, as far as possible, to allow Kodály to speak for himself. In his case this has been all the more appropriate, since, unlike many composers, he has been a voluminous writer on a variety of subjects; and his writings tell us more about his ideas--more even about his music, perhaps--than any amount of analysis. On occasion, too, we have quoted his contemporaries, both his supporters and his opponents, for it was in the cross-fire of their opinions that his maturity as an artist was forged. Yet, as author, we ourselves have not remained completely silent. By our selection and editing of his views we have inevitably indicated our own; but, though our principal aim has been to provide some account of his manifold activities, we may hope that we have also contributed something new to the understanding of the man and the artist.

As an epigraph to the first three chapters, we might well have reprinted the following words from the book that was published as a tribute to him on his seventy-fifth birthday: "If the musical culture of Hungary has emerged from its state of semi-ignorance of fifty years ago, and is, to-day, a part of the spiritual treasury of the world, one of the noblest pledges of our status as human beings and as a nation, it is in very large measure as a result of the work of one man, Zoltán Kodály."

The final chapter, which is an independent study of his music, is an attempt to reveal the roots of his art, to trace its development, and to distinguish the main characteristics of his original and highly individual style. But here, too, we have allowed him to speak for himself, for the text is only the accompaniment, so to speak, to the musical illustrations, and it will have fulfilled its purpose if it inspires others to a more profound and penetrating study of his work.

It was not without good reason that, at the beginning of the century, Kodály evoked the hostility of conservative critics, for his music was revolutionary in its originality. To-day, a fresh debate has been provoked by the daring innovations of a younger generation of composers, which for the moment may seem to overshadow the initiative of the pioneers at the beginning of the century. But the steady glow of Kodály's noble classicism and profound humanism still persists, because its source is inexhaustible: his faith in mankind, and in the future of his own people. That faith he himself

-167-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Zoltaan Kodaaly; His Life and Work
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Table of Contents 5
  • List of Illustrations 6
  • Preface 7
  • KodÁly's Life 11
  • The Musicologist 47
  • The Teacher 66
  • The Composer 88
  • By Way of Epilogue 167
  • Notes 169
  • Appendices 174
  • Index 179
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 186

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.