The Interest Group Connection: Electioneering, Lobbying, and Policymaking in Washington

By Paul S. Herrnson; Ronald G. Shaiko et al. | Go to book overview
Save to active project

7
Grassroots Organizations and Equilibrium Cycles in Group Mobilization and Access

James G. Gimpel

INTEREST groups in America can be categorized by their dominant strategies of influence -- the principal activity the group engages in to ensure that the doors of policymakers are opened to its ideas and goals. A group's dominant strategy is its path to power, its means for obtaining access. For some groups, the dominant strategy is the campaign contribution; for others, it is litigation and legal expertise; for some, it is information and technical expertise; and for still others, it is the capacity to mobilize thousands of donors and other members at the grassroots.

This chapter examines interest groups whose dominant strategy of influence is the activation of a mass base to bring pressure to bear on Congress. Drawn from interviews conducted in 1995, the chapter further focuses on activities by a variety of conservative and liberal groups in response to the Republican takeover of Congress. The 1994 elections changed entrenched patterns of access and influence. Groups that were closely aligned with the Democrats were fenced out, while groups allied with the out-party found that they had unprecedented access. This dramatic reversal of fortune suggests that interest group mobilization and influence are subject to the same kind of equilibrium fluctuations that are observable in the American two-party system.

-100-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Interest Group Connection: Electioneering, Lobbying, and Policymaking in Washington
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 376

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?