The Interest Group Connection: Electioneering, Lobbying, and Policymaking in Washington

By Paul S. Herrnson; Ronald G. Shaiko et al. | Go to book overview
Save to active project

17
Please God, Save This Honorable Court: The Emergence of the Conservative Religious Bar

Gregg Ivers

SHORTLY before he was to begin his historic confrontation in a Dayton, Tennessee, courtroom with Clarence Darrow over the meaning of the Bible and its place in American public education, William Jennings Bryan told a throng of assembled supporters that the Scopes trial was more than just his personal effort to save "the Christian Church from those who are trying to destroy her faith." With charm and charisma pouring from the shadow where he stood, Bryan announced that his case posed an equally disturbing question: Can a minority use the courts to force its ideas upon the schools and the larger society? Majorities acted with the natural self-restraint that the Constitution required. If the Godless were indeed a majority, then by all means elect them. And if they were not, then was it fair to have the courts impose their will on an unwelcoming citizenry through constitutional edict ( Ginger 1958, 90)?

To Bryan, of course, the answer was no. Today a movement of Christian evangelicals and fundamentalists three generations removed from the Scopes trial of the 1920s seeks to frame a legal debate on issues of church and state in the same manner. Through skill and determination, today's conservative Christians have the potential to leave their mark on the constitutional relationship between church and state with far greater success than any of their predecessors.

This chapter addresses three major questions in an effort to place the rise of the conservative religious legal movement in the broader context of

-289-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Interest Group Connection: Electioneering, Lobbying, and Policymaking in Washington
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 376

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?