The Ethics of Benedict de Spinoza: Demonstrated after the Method of Geometers, and Divided into Five Parts, in Which Are Treated Separately: I. of God. II. of the Soul. III. of the Affections or Passions. IV. of Man's Slavery, or the Force of the Passions. V. of Man's Freedom - Vol. 1

By Benedict De Spinoza | Go to book overview

APPENDIX.

IN the foregoing pages I have sought to explain the nature and properties of God -- as, that God exists necessarily; that God is One; that by the sole necessity of God's nature God is and acts; that God is the Free Cause of all things, and how God is so: that all things are in God, and so depend on God that without God they could neither be nor be conceived to be; and, lastly, that all things were predetermined by God, not, indeed, by virtue of God's free will or God's absolute good pleasure, but by virtue of the absolute nature or infinite power of God. I have, moreover, whenever opportunity offered, sought to remove prejudices which might prevent my demonstrations from being accepted; but as not a few such prejudices remain, and have prevented and still do powerfully prevent men from comprehending the views of the concatenation of things as I have explained them, I have thought it would not be an useless labor to summon these prejudices before the bar of reason and examine them. And inasmuch as all of these prejudices of which I shall speak here receive their support from and are dependent upon this single one -- namely, that men commonly suppose that all natural things act, like themselves, for an end, and that God also directs all things with a certain and determined end in view (for, say they, God made all things for man, and made man that he might worship God) -- I shall therefore begin with this one, inquiring first into the cause why most men acquiesce in this prejudice, and why all seem by nature

-46-

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The Ethics of Benedict de Spinoza: Demonstrated after the Method of Geometers, and Divided into Five Parts, in Which Are Treated Separately: I. of God. II. of the Soul. III. of the Affections or Passions. IV. of Man's Slavery, or the Force of the Passions. V. of Man's Freedom - Vol. 1
Table of contents

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  • Title Page i
  • Translator's Preface. iii
  • Corrections. *
  • Appendix. 46
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