Memoirs Illustrating the History of Napoleon I from 1802 to 1815 - Vol. 2

By Claude-François de Méneval; Napoleon Joseph de Méneval | Go to book overview

CHAPTER IV.

Thoughts of Divorce-Arguments in favour of a New Marriage--Fouché's Strange Behaviour--Secret Interview with Emperor Alexander--Three Marriages Under Consideration--Empress Josephine's Anxiety--The Ice is Broken--Napoleon's Generous Feelings for Josephine--Portrait of this Princess--Noble Conduct of Her Children--Reasons for Annulling Napoleon I.'s Marriage--Senatus Consultum Annuls the Civil Marriage and the Officiality of Paris Breaks the Religious Ties--Farewell Scenes--The Emperor at Trianon--His Visit to La Malmaison--His Return to Paris--Prolonged Hesitation of Russia--The Austrian Ambassador is Approached on the Matter Indirectly--Austria's Proposals Accepted-Choice of the Arch-- Duchess Marie Louise--Signing the Deed of Betrothal--The Emperor Francis' Four Wives--Education of the Austrian Princesses--Marie Louise's First Feelings on the Subject of the Marriage-Her Brothers' and Sisters' Hatred for the Name of Napoleon--Three Months' Stay in Paris-His Occupations and Amusements--The Allied Sovereigns Summoned to Paris--KingLouis of Holland Hesitates about Going--Establishment of the State Prisons--La-- Salha--Rome United to the Empire--Amenities of the English Press-- Napoleon's Respect for Etiquette--His Autograph Letter to the Emperor of Austria--Visit of the King and Queen of Bavaria to the Tuileries-- Arrangements Made by the Emperor for His Marriage--PrinceWagram Sent to Vienna--His Reception--Civil and Religious Marriage--Banquet-- Unusual Respect with which the Ambassador is Treated-Napoleon's Care for the Dignity of France--Departure of the New Empress from Vienna--Regrets of the Viennese--Popular Emotion--EmperorNapoleon's Complaints--Measures Taken Against the French who had become Austrians--The Marriage Does Not Re--establish Harmony Between the Two States-The Austrian Oligarchy-- Backward Glances at the War which Preceded the Marriage--Secret Policy of the Vienna Cabinet--Projects of Coalition--Napoleon's Confidence in His Powers--Pozzo-di-Borgo--Particulars About Him-Protection Accorded to Him by the Marquis of Wellesley--The Empress' Arrival at Strasburg-- The Emperor Awaits Her at Compiègne--Exchange of Letters between the Two Spouses--Preparation for the Reception of the Empress at Soissons-- The Ceremonial Decided Upon is Not Carried Out-Arrival at Compiègne-- Portrait of Marie Louise--Departure for St. Cloud--The Emperor's Decision Upon the Crown to be Used at the Coronation--Civil Marriage at St. Cloud-- Public Rejoicing--Solemn Entry into Paris--Religious Marriage--The Absence of certain Cardinals from the Ceremony is Noticed-The Magnificence of the Fêtes--Presents from the City of Paris--Marie Louise's dowry is Paid into the Public Treasury--Return to Compiègne--Particulars About the Empress' Household--The Lady Ushers in Waiting and the Mistress of the Wardrobe--The Empress' Privy Purse--Enthusiasm with which the Poets Celebrate the Marriage-Fêtes Given at Valançay by the French Princes-Baron de Collay at the Castle of Valançay--Importance of the State of Affairs in Spain--Project of a Journey to Belgium--Reasons for this Journey--Napoleon Complains about the Dutch-Unsuccessful Diplomatic Negotiations--Discussion Between the Emperor and the King of Holland--The Occupation of Berg-op-Zoom and of Breda--Cession of the Dutch Frontier--The Emperor's Letter to King Louis--Departure from Compiègne--Visit to the St. Quentin Canal--Stay at Antwerp--Enthusi

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Memoirs Illustrating the History of Napoleon I from 1802 to 1815 - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Chapter I 1
  • Chapter II 78
  • Chapter III 166
  • Chapter IV 246
  • Chapter V 328
  • Chapter VI 398
  • Index - Of Names of Persons Mentioned in This Volume. 473
  • I N D E X - Of Books, Periodicals, Plays. Hymns, Songs, Etc., Referred to in This Volume. 484
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