Index to Translated Short Fiction by Latin American Women in English Language Anthologies

By Kathy S. Leonard | Go to book overview

Preface

Introduction

During the past ten years there has been a dramatic change in the situation of women writers in Latin America as well as in the interest the reading public has shown in their work worldwide. In the United States, much of this heightened interest coincided with the formation of women's studies programs in American universities, programs which have often challenged the prevailing notion of what is considered worthy of scholarly interest and analysis. Consequently, many works of literature written by women have gained new respect and attention.

This new-found status in women's literature has caused publishers to take note, dramatically increasing the number of works by Latin American women writers being published, not only in their own countries, but also in the United States and Britain, where novels and collections of short stories are appearing in the original Spanish as well as in English translation. Among these publishers are a number of important academic presses, which include the University of Nebraska Press, that has a Latin American Women Writers series, and the University of Texas, which publishes women's work in their Texas Pan-American series. Another important publisher of women's writing is the Latin American Literary Review Press, which specializes in the publishing of popular and scholarly books on Latin American subjects, most of them translations of important Latin American literary work. The Latin American Literary Review Press has recently published a number of both well-known and unknown women authors in their series titled Discoveries, among them, Jacqueline Balcells ( Chile), Julieta Campos, Angelina Mufiiz-Huberman, and Rosario Castellanos ( Mexico), and Carmen Naranjo and Rima de Vallbona ( Costa Rica). Smaller presses also active in this area include White Pine Press, with its Secret Weavers list directed by Marjorie Agosín, Curbstone Press, Westview Press, Cleis Press, and Aunt Lute, all of which have published a number of titles by Latin American women writers.

The large trade presses of New York have begun to follow suit, with several of them seeking out work by Chicana, Latina, and Latin American women writers. These publishers are most often interested in novel-length works, but will

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Index to Translated Short Fiction by Latin American Women in English Language Anthologies
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Preface ix
  • I - Anthology Index 1
  • II - Alphabetical Author Index 51
  • III - Author by Country Index 57
  • IV - Title Index 63
  • V - Authors and Their Works Index 93
  • Works Cited: Bibliographies of Latin American Literature in Translation 119
  • About the Compiler *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 120

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.