I Was Born a Slave: An Anthology of Classic Slave Narratives, 1770-1849 - Vol. 1

By Yuval Taylor | Go to book overview

APPENDIX.

A SKETCH OF THE CLARKE FAMILY. BY LEWIS CLARKE.
MY mother was called a very handsome woman. She was very much esteemed by all who knew her; the slaves looked up to her for advice. She died, much lamented, of the cholera, in the year 1833. I was not at home, and had not even the melancholy pleasure of following her to her grave.
1. The name of the oldest member of the family was Archy. He never enjoyed very good health, but was a man of great ingenuity, and very much beloved by all his associates, colored and white. Through his own exertions, and the kindness of C. M. Clay, and one or two other friends, he procured his freedom. He lived to repay Mr. Clay and others the money advanced for him, but not long enough to enjoy for many years the freedom for which he had struggled so hard. He paid six hundred dollars for himself. He died about seven years since, leaving a wife and four or five children in bondage; the inheritance of the widow and poor orphans is, LABOR WITHOUT WAGES; WRONGS WITH NO REDRESS; SEPARATION FROM EACH OTHER FOR LIFE, and no being to hear their complaint, but that God who is the widow's God and Judge. "Shall I not be avenged on such a nation as this?" 21
2. Sister Christiana was next to Archy in age. She was first married to a free colored man. By him she had several children. Her master did not like this connection, and her husband was driven away, and told never to be seen there again. The name of her master is Oliver Anderson; he is a leading man in the Presbyterian church, and is considered one of the best among slaveholders. Mr. Anderson married Polly Campbell, at the time I was given to Mrs. Betsey Banton. I believe she and Mrs. Banton have not spoken together since they divided the slaves at the death of their father. They are the only two sisters now living of the Campbell family.
3. Dennis is the third member of our family. He is a free man in Kentucky, and is doing a very good business there. He was assisted by a Mr. William L. Stevenson, and also by his sister, in getting his freedom. He never had any knowledge of our intention of running away, nor did he assist us in any manner whatever.
4. Alexander is the fourth child of my mother. He is the slave of a Dr. Richardson; has with him a very easy time; lives as well as a man can and be a slave; has no intention of running away. He lives very much like a second-hand gentleman, and I do not know as he would leave Kentucky on any condition.
5. My mother lost her fifth child soon after it was born.
6. Delia came next. Hers was a most bitter and tragical history. She was so unfortunate as to be uncommonly handsome, and, when arrived at woman's estate, was considered a great prize for the guilty passions of the slaveholders.

-652-

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I Was Born a Slave: An Anthology of Classic Slave Narratives, 1770-1849 - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Library of Black America ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Introduction xv
  • James Albert Ukawsaw Gronniosaw 1
  • Narrative of the Most Remarkable Particulars in the Life of James Albert Ukawsaw Gronniosaw, an African Prince, as Related by Himself 4
  • The Preface to the Reader 6
  • Olaudah Equiano (Gustavus Vassa) 29
  • The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, or Gustavus Vassa, the African. Written by Himself 34
  • To the Lords Spiritual and Temporal,14 and the Commons of the Parliament of Great Britain 35
  • List of Subscribers.15 36
  • Contents of Volume I 40
  • Chapter I 41
  • Chapter II 51
  • Chapter III 61
  • Chapter IV 70
  • Chapter V 82
  • Chapter VI 94
  • The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, or Gustavus Vassa, the African 106
  • Contents of Volume II 108
  • Chapter VII 109
  • Chapter VIII 117
  • Chapter IX 126
  • Chapter X 136
  • Chapter XI 148
  • Chapter XII 162
  • William Grimes 181
  • Life of William Grimes, the Runaway Slave. Written by Himself 184
  • To the Public 186
  • Life of William Grimes 187
  • Nat Turner 235
  • The Confessions of Nat Turner, the Leader of the Late Insurrection in Southampton, Va. 240
  • To the Public 242
  • Charles Ball 259
  • Slavery in the United States: A Narrative of the Life and Adventures of Charles Ball, , - A Black Man 263
  • Preface 264
  • Chapter I 265
  • Chapter II 270
  • Chapter II 273
  • Chapter IV 279
  • Chapter V 288
  • Chapter VI 304
  • Chapter VIII 312
  • Chapter IX 318
  • Chapter X 328
  • Chapter XI 340
  • Chapter XII 348
  • Chapter XIII 354
  • Chapter XIV 373
  • Chapter XV 383
  • Chapter XVI 398
  • Chapter XVII 406
  • Chapter XVIII 413
  • Chapter XIX 417
  • Chapter XX 437
  • Chapter XXI 445
  • Chapter XXII 460
  • Chapter XXIII 461
  • Chapter XXIV 469
  • Chapter XXV 475
  • Chapter XXVI 485
  • Moses Roper 487
  • A Narrative of the Adventures and Escape of Moses Roper, from American Slavery; 489
  • Preface 490
  • Introduction 492
  • Frederick Douglass 523
  • Preface 530
  • Chapter I 537
  • Chapter II 540
  • Chapter II 543
  • Chapter IV 546
  • Chapter V 548
  • Chapter VI 551
  • Chapter VIII 553
  • Chapter IX 557
  • Chapter X 560
  • Chapter XI 563
  • Chapter XII 582
  • Appendix 592
  • Lewis and Milton Clarke 601
  • Narratives of the Sufferings of Lewis and Milton Clarke, Sons of a Soldier of the Revolution, during a Captivity of More Than Twenty Years among the Slaveholders of Kentucky, One of the So Called Christian States of North America. Dictated by Themselves 605
  • Preface 606
  • Narrative of Milton Clarke 636
  • Preface 637
  • Appendix 652
  • Order of Exercises for a Slaveholders' Meeting 666
  • William Wells Brown 673
  • Narrative of William W. Brown, a Fugitive Slave 678
  • Preface 681
  • Chapter I 684
  • Chapter II 685
  • Chapter II 686
  • Chapter IV 688
  • Chapter V 691
  • Chapter VI 693
  • Chapter VIII 699
  • Chapter IX 700
  • Chapter X 702
  • Chapter XI 704
  • Chapter XII 706
  • Chapter XIII 708
  • Chapter XIV 710
  • Chapter XV 712
  • Josiah Henson 719
  • The Life of Josiah Henson, Formerly a Slave, Now an Inhabitant of Canada, as Narrated by Himself 724
  • Life of Josiah Henson 725
  • Bibliography 757
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