Immigration in America's Future: Social Science Findings and the Policy Debate

By David M. Heer | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Much of this book was written in the fall of 1993 when I was on sabbatical at El Colegio de la Frontera Norte (COLEF) in Tijuana, Mexico. I wish to thank Jorge Bustamante, president of that institution, for providing me with an office there. An important part of Chapter 4 could not have been written without access to the library at COLEF. Moreover, contact with the faculty and the ongoing research at that institution considerably broadened my intellectual horizon.

I am also indebted to Amentha Dymally, administrative assistant of the Population Research Laboratory at the University of Southern California, for her many actions that facilitated the writing of this book. Thanks are also due to Professor Maurice D. Van Arsdol, Jr., who was director of the Population Research Laboratory during most of the time in which this book was being prepared.

At Westview Press, I wish to thank senior editor Mr. Dean Birkenkamp, assistant editor Jill Rothenberg, editorial assistant Annemarie Preonas, associate project editor Laurie Milford, and my copy editor, Alice Colwell. All of these persons helped immeasurably to improve this book.

I wish to express my appreciation to Professor Charles Tilly of the New School for Social Research, who, as editor of the Foundations of Social Inquiry Series of Westview Press, made cogent comments on the entire manuscript. Thanks are also due to two anonymous reviewers who also helped me improve the manuscript.

I also wish to thank Professor Steven J. Gold, of the Department of Sociology, Michigan State University, for allowing me to use his very fine photographs for this work.

Finally, I wish to thank my wife, Kaye, for her willingness to endure my often unpleasant moods for the entire period in which the writing of this book took place.

David M. Heer

-xi-

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Immigration in America's Future: Social Science Findings and the Policy Debate
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • 1 - Overview 1
  • Notes 5
  • 2 - The Volume and Character of Future Immigration: The Values at Stake 7
  • 3 - The Influence of Social Science Findings 17
  • Notes 25
  • 4 - The History of U.S. Immigration Law 27
  • Notes 71
  • 5 - Patterns of Immigration to and from the United States 77
  • Notes 133
  • 6 - Determinants of Immigration 137
  • Notes 159
  • 7 - Enforcement of Immigration Law 161
  • Notes 179
  • 8 - The Impact of Immigration 183
  • Notes 206
  • 9 - Proposals for Change in U.S. Immigration Law 209
  • Notes 222
  • Bibliography 225
  • About the Book and Author 237
  • Index 238
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