The Later Crusades, 1274-1580: From Lyons to Alcazar

By Norman Housley | Go to book overview

10
The End of the Reconquista: Granada and Beyond, 1415-1580

THE pivotal point of this chapter is the series of campaigns waged between 1482 and 1492 by the 'Catholic Monarchs', Ferdinand and Isabella, which culminated in the conquest of the Emirate of Granada and the ending of Muslim power in Spain (see maps 10 and 11). Recent research has confirmed the political significance of these events, while in its scale and intensity the Granada war ranks alongside the Varna campaign and the wars against the Hussites as one of the greatest crusades of the fifteenth century. Thanks largely to the work of Professor M. A. Ladero Quesada, the character of the war itself is now clear; but both the background to the crusade, and its long-term results, remain highly problematic. In the case of the former, the difficulty lies in deciding whether or not the crusade represented a radical change in Castilian policy towards Granada and, more broadly, attitudes towards convivencia. And in the case of the crusade's long-term results, the dominant question is the fate of Iberian crusading ideas, institutions, and attitudes after the completion of the Reconquista. Continuity is apparent in some features of Spanish government and society in the sixteenth century, such as 's advance into North Africa and the resultant struggle with the Ottomans, and the survival into the Early Modern period of both the Iberian Military Orders and the 'Bula de la cruzada'. But investigation of the subtler links between the crusade and the Spanish conquest of the New World, and Habsburg imperial policy generally, forms one of the most tantalizing aspects of the history of later crusading.

The difficulty of making an accurate assessment of 's policy towards Granada in the decades between the fall of Antequera in 1410

-291-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Later Crusades, 1274-1580: From Lyons to Alcazar
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 528

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.