The Government of China (1644-1911)

By Pao Chao Hsieh | Go to book overview

BIBLIOGRAPHY

I. BOOKS IN THE CHINESE LANGUAGE

A. Government Publications
Chin Ting Ta Tsing Hui Tien: Collected Institutes of the Tsing Dynasty. Five editions, the first in 1694, the second in 1727, the third in 1764, the fourth in 1815 and the fifth in 1885 were issued. The latest official issuance, that of 1885, is used here. 100 chuan.1
Chin Ting Ta Tsing Hui Tien Shih Li:Amendments to (or Cases on) the Collected Institutes of the Tsing Dynasty. Five editions of this book were issued about the same time the Collected Institutes of the Tsing Dynasty appeared. The fifth edition is here used. 1200 chuan.
Chin Ting Ku Tsin Tu Shu Chi Cheng: The Chinese Encyclopedia. For details of this book, see: Lionel Giles, An Alphabetical Index to the Chinese Encyclopedia, published by the British Museum, London, 1911.
Ta Tsing Li Lui Chi Pien Lan:The Penal Code of the Tsing Dynasty. For details of this book, see: Sir George Staunton's translation.
Nei Ko Kung Pao or Cheng Fu Kung Pao:The Official Gazette. A daily publication of the government.
Chin Ting Huang Chao Tung Chi:Tung Chi of the Tsing Dynasty. Published 1767. This contains records of political and economic institutions of the Tsing Dynasty. The style of writing is based on the Tung Chi by Cheng Chao. 200 chuan.
Chin Ting Huang Chao Tung Tien:Tung Tien of the Tsing Dynasty. Published 1767. It contains records of the political and economic institutions of the dynasty written in the same style as the Tung Tien by Tu Yao. 100 chuan.
Chin Ting Huang Chao Wen Hsien Tung Kao:Wen Hsien Tung Kao of the Tsing Dynasty. Published 1747. A record of the political and economic institutions of the Tsing Dynasty written in the same style as the Wen Hsien Tung Kao by Ma Tuan Lin. 266 chuan.
____________________
1
One chuan in a Chinese book contains from about 25 to 100 pages. One Chinese page equals two English pages. The word Chuan means a roll which was the standard of the size of a book before the invention of printing in China.

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