Lucian, Satirist and Artist

By Francis G. Allinson | Go to book overview

V. PHILOSOPHY AND ETHICS

IN LUCIAN'S scheme of life we need spend less time, than we must in the case of the Platonized Socrates, in distinguishing the purely speculative from the practical. Although he speaks so often and so glibly of philosophy and the philosophers he does not concern himself in detail with transmuting the transcendental into the pragmatic. He does, on occasion, contemptuously record certain obvious catch-words and theses from the pre-Socratic philosophers, from Socrates himself and his contemporaries, or from the subsequent realignment and development of philosophic speculation, but all this affords him mere copy for his cartoons or, at best, an abridged manual of practical rules of conduct. Usually he remained not only tone-deaf to the Pythagorean "music of the spheres" but apparently stone-blind to Plato's "vision of the more excellent in the ideal." Only rarely does he allow some deeper misgiving to break through the salt crust of satire, as in his allusion to the haven of true

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Lucian, Satirist and Artist
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • I- Credentials for The Twentieth Century 3
  • Ii. Age of the Antonines 14
  • Iii. Life of Lucian 24
  • IV- Extant Writings: Form And Content 37
  • V. Philosophy and Ethics 47
  • Vi. the Supernatural 65
  • VII- Other Dramatic Dialogues: Polemics 100
  • VIII- Lucian's Creditors And Debtors 121
  • Notes 191
  • Condensed Bibliography 203
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