White Women's Rights: The Racial Origins of Feminism in the United States

By Louise Michele Newman | Go to book overview

Notes

Introduction
1.
Report of the International Council of Women, Assembled by the National Woman Suffrage Association, Washington, D.C., U.S. of America, March 25 to April 1, 1888 ( Washington, D.C.: Rufus H. Darby, 1888), p. 48.
2.
Cited without attribution in Kathleen Barry, Susan B. Anthony: A Biography of a Singular Feminist ( New York: New York University Press, 1988), pp. 318-319.
3.
Susan B. Anthony to Elizabeth Cady Stanton, January 27, 1884, University of Rochester Library Archives, cited in Barry, Susan B. Anthony, p. 319.
4.
For an account of racial conflict within the suffrage movement, see Ellen Carol DuBois, Feminism and Suffrage: The Emergence of an Independent Women's Movement in America, 1848-1869 ( Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1978), pp. 162-202.
5.
Anthony to Stanton, January 27, 1884, University of Rochester Archives, cited in Barry, Susan B. Anthony, p. 319.
6.
"Address to the National Woman Suffrage Convention," Washington, D.C., January 19, 1869, reprinted in The Concise History of Woman Suffrage: Selections from the Classic Work of Stanton, Anthony, Gage and Harper, ed. Mari Jo Buhle and Paul Buhle ( Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1978), p. 254,
7.
Stanton, "Address to the National Woman Suffrage Convention," p. 254.
8.
For a discussion of these associations, see Barry, Susan B. Anthony, pp. 322-323, 346-347.
9.
Robert H. Terrell, "Our Debt to Suffragists," Crisis 10 ( August 1915): 181.
10.
Terrell, "Our Debt to Suffragists," p. 181.
11.
Terrell, "Our Debt to Suffragists," p. 181.
12.
See Nancy F. Cott, The Grounding of Modern Feminism ( New Haven: Yale University Press, 1987); Hazel Carby, Reconstructing Womanhood: The Emergence of the Afro-American Woman Novelist ( New York: Oxford University Press, 1987); and Paula Giddings, When and Where I Enter: The Impact of Black Women on Race and Sex in America ( New York: Bantam Books, 1984).

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