Entangled Voices: Genre and the Religious Construction of the Self

By Frederick J. Ruf | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

For six years, from 1988 until 1994, the topics in this book were a continual source of conversations with my friends, family, colleagues, and students, even with my children as we read bedtime stories. I doubt, therefore, that I can acknowledge adequately all who helped these thoughts move along. Gordon Kaufman, as always, was provocative and seminal; every scholar should have the benefit of his conversation. Of great value were Richard Niebuhr and William Graham, in whose seminar twelve years ago these thoughts first glimmered. James Engell sharpened my thinking and informed it with sources, especially for the chapter on Coleridge. Colleagues at Georgetown University provided just the intellectual atmosphere one hopes for in academia. In particular, Theresa Sanders and Joe Murphy gave me the sort of lunch table and office door stimulation that should have produced a far better book. John Glavin, Jim Donahue, Francisca Bantly, Victoria Pedrick, Diane Yeager, Charles Winquist, and Stanley Hauerwas provided helpful stimulus or support. Stephen Webb read the manuscript with eyes that saw subtleties I had never perceived. His suggestions gave the book qualities that certainly strengthen it. I would like to acknowledge the Landegger Fund for both summer and semester research leaves; Efrat Tseelon's conference on Mask, Masquerade, and Carnival in Venice in 1994, which helped me develop the chapter on Robert Wilson; Alessandra Farkas and Lewis Rosenbluth, who assisted my research on

-vii-

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