Names and Stories: Emilia Dilke and Victorian Culture

By Kali Israel | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Names cannot come near telling the stories that enabled this book.

The life-world I have found at the University of Michigan, in and beyond the Department of History, and in Ann Arbor, made this book possible, allowing, challenging, encouraging, and enjoining me to think and rethink, write and rewrite, take chances and pleasures, over the last five years. Dear friends and colleagues have given support, hilarity, food and drink, and a life I love. These names move me: Susan Johnson, Carroll Smith-Rosenberg, Fred Cooper and Jane Burbank, Tom and Ruth Green, Martha Vicinus, Richard Candída Smith, Sue Juster, George Sanchez, Scott Spector, David William Cohen, and Gina Morantz-Sanchez. Bill and Elie Rosenberg, Kathleen Canning, David Scobey, and Sonya Rose have been especially enspiriting, entertaining, and generous, and their friendships give me great joy. Linda Gregerson and Steven Mullaney, John Kucich, Adela Pinch, and Patsy Yaegar of the University of Michigan English Department have given thoughts and warmth I treasure. The fabulous FFBs of my writing group--Yopie Prins, Liz Wingrove, and Catherine Brown-- read and read and read some more, with consistently improving results, and I have learned more than I may know from their own works. The Program in the Comparative Study of Social Transformations heard two pieces of this project in draft but helped even more by providing the best possible space for ongoing interdisciplinary thought over the years. Students at all levels have allowed me to think by listening and by sharing their own work. The staff of the History Department are always smart, helpful, and right. A summer research grant from University of Michigan was crucial in enabling my research. Dagmar Herzog and Lauren Berlant have been marvelously enthusiastic readers and friends. This book would also not exist without the Michigan Theatre, the staffs of far too many cafes, the friendship and wisdom of Nick Chapman,

-vii-

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Names and Stories: Emilia Dilke and Victorian Culture
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents xi
  • Introduction Genres of Life-Writing 3
  • 1 - On Not Being an Orphan 19
  • 2 - Pictures and Lessons 39
  • 3 - Making a Marriage 74
  • 4 - Bodies Marriage, Adultery, and Death 108
  • 5 - The Resources of Style 162
  • 6 - French Vices 198
  • 7 - Renaissances 240
  • Notes 265
  • Identified Works by E F. S. Pattison/Dilke 341
  • Index 347
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