Names and Stories: Emilia Dilke and Victorian Culture

By Kali Israel | Go to book overview

2
PICTURES AND LESSONS

Pictures haunt texts about Francis Strong's childhood. D.S. Maccoll, who knew Francis Pattison in his undergraduate days at Lincoln College and Emilia Dilke as a fellow art critic, wrote of seeing a picture of Francis Strong as a little girl, "curled up in the window of a book-lined Holywell sitting room, immersed in reading." 1 Charles Dilke's memoir claims two of "a series of original historical cartoons" in pen- and-ink by Francis as a child had "been thought by critics to be worth preservation and exhibition," but neither names the critics nor divulges the location and subjects of the drawings. Francis Strong's childhood artwork is invoked but invisible, perhaps surviving but not in public. As further proof of the claim that Francis Strong's "art turn" was "developed at an early age," Dilke's memoir cites a text about pictures--Sir Charles Bell Essays on the Anatomy of Expression in Painting--which Francis bought with her "first pocket-money" at age eleven. Dilke makes the book an emblem of the continuity between Francis Strong and Emilia Dilke--it was her "most cherished possession" and she inscribed it "E. Francis Strong, 1851" and reinscribed it "Emilia F. S. Dilke, 1885" when she gave it to him as a wedding gift. Dilke also attributes Francis's embarkation on a London art education to the encouragement and support she received from John Ruskin after he saw her drawings from casts in the Ashmolean Museum, "from the skeleton and from life." 2

Another story about a picture was told by both Dilkes. Charles Dilke recounts a story of little Francis Strong, aged nine, in 1849, sitting on the knees of an as yet pre-Pre-Raphaelite John Everett Millais. She "directed him to draw for her a spirited sketch of a cavalry battle under Stirling Castle." Charles guarantees his text by referring to his possession of physical proof: "[the picture] hangs now in my room at Pyrford

-39-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Names and Stories: Emilia Dilke and Victorian Culture
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 374

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.