Never Again: A President Runs for a Third Term

By Herbert S. Parmet; Marie B. Hecht | Go to book overview

CHAPTER THREE "The Darkest Horse in the Stable"

1

SAM PRYOR, the Republican national committeeman from Connecticut, sat in his Greenwich home on the night of January 6, 1938, and as the clock neared 9:30 he tuned his radio to station WJZ, New York. At that moment Pryor and some two million others were awaiting the start of "America's Town Meeting of the Air," a weekly discussion of current issues. About to join George V. Denny, Jr., the program's moderator, was Assistant Attorney General Robert H. Jackson, who was often mentioned as a possible successor to FDR, and Wendell L. Willkie. Willkie was president of the great Commonwealth and Southern utilities holding corporation that controlled eleven electric power distributing companies on both sides of the Mason and Dixon line. But to Sam Pryor, who was an assistant to the president of the American Brake Shoe and Foundry Company and a director of several other corporations, Willkie was more than just another fellow business magnate. He was becoming known as an

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Never Again: A President Runs for a Third Term
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Prologue the Third Term Tradition 1
  • Chapter One - the Artful Dodger 7
  • Chapter Two - "The Stab in the Back" 23
  • Chapter Three - "The Darkest Horse in the Stable" 51
  • Chapter Four - "Life Begins in '40" 73
  • Chapter Five - Closing the Gap 103
  • Chapter Six - "We Want Willkie!" 127
  • Chapter Seven - the President Decides 163
  • Chapter Eight Shattering a Tradition 179
  • Chapter Nine "The Rich Man's Roosevelt" 197
  • Chapter Ten the Candidate Joins His Party 217
  • Chapter Eleven Political Speeches 237
  • Chapter Twelve the Third Term 259
  • Epilogue Never Again 281
  • Notes on Sources 290
  • Index 296
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