Never Again: A President Runs for a Third Term

By Herbert S. Parmet; Marie B. Hecht | Go to book overview

CHAPTER EIGHT Shattering a Tradition

1

AS THE DEMOCRATIC delegates started to converge on Chicago for the business of choosing a presidential candidate, Franklin Roosevelt invited Judge Samuel Rosenman to join him at the White House. Rosenman, who had been with the President during the convention weeks of 1932 and 1936, sent his family on ahead to Montana for their vacation and obeyed the summons. Most observers immediately concluded that Rosenman's presence meant that he was there to help write the third-term acceptance speech.

Washington was particularly hot and humid that July, a discomfort that the President did not have relieved by air conditioning. He said that refrigeration irritated his sinuses, and he permitted only a floor fan to be placed far away from him in a corner of the study. He made himself as cool as possible by wearing seersucker trousers, removing his jacket and tie, unbuttoning his collar and rolling up his sleeves. He looked uncomfortable as his clothes wrinkled, and he perspired

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Never Again: A President Runs for a Third Term
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Prologue the Third Term Tradition 1
  • Chapter One - the Artful Dodger 7
  • Chapter Two - "The Stab in the Back" 23
  • Chapter Three - "The Darkest Horse in the Stable" 51
  • Chapter Four - "Life Begins in '40" 73
  • Chapter Five - Closing the Gap 103
  • Chapter Six - "We Want Willkie!" 127
  • Chapter Seven - the President Decides 163
  • Chapter Eight Shattering a Tradition 179
  • Chapter Nine "The Rich Man's Roosevelt" 197
  • Chapter Ten the Candidate Joins His Party 217
  • Chapter Eleven Political Speeches 237
  • Chapter Twelve the Third Term 259
  • Epilogue Never Again 281
  • Notes on Sources 290
  • Index 296
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