The Faces of Reason: An Essay on Philosophy and Culture in English Canada, 1850-1950

By Leslie Armour; Elizabeth Trott | Go to book overview

FOUR
REASON AND MORALITY

George Paxton Youngand the Foundations of Ethics

PAXTON YOUNG'S career is a reflection of the intellectual tensions and changes which troubled and strengthened English Canada from the 1850s onwards. He was just seventeen years younger than James Beaven and both of them joined the tiny academic community in Toronto at about the same time. Young became a professor at Knox College in 1851. The difference between their intellectual outlooks is the difference between a man who made minor adjustments to a body of traditional beliefs and a man who introduced new and radical ideas.

Young holds a remarkable place in the history of Canadian philosophy. He was the first of the long and influential line of Canadian idealists and the first to mark a firm line between religion and philosophy--a line which caused him, briefly, to give up his livelihood. Though his writings are mostly fragmentary and frequently known to us mainly through notes of his students, enough survives to make him an object of continuing interest.

Young was born in Scotland in 1818 (a few sources give 1819), went to Edinburgh High School and on to the University of Edinburgh. He faced the schism in the Church of Scotland ("the great disruption") and chose to study divinity at the Free Church Hall. He served as a clergyman in Paisley and in London and then--for reasons which seem now lost--resolved to come to Canada. It did not take him long to obtain a church in Hamilton and he quickly made a reputation as a preacher.

A volume of his sermons from that period reveals little which would suggest his later career--unless one reads between the lines. The schisms which wracked the church in Scotland had exact parallels amongst Presbyterians in Canada and Young wrestled with the problems that posed. Perhaps that is the meaning of his sermon which urges that "making peace" is the first duty of a Christian, though on the surface it is concerned, innocuously enough, with the proposition that

-85-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Faces of Reason: An Essay on Philosophy and Culture in English Canada, 1850-1950
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 550

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.