The Letters of William Cullen Bryant - Vol. 1

By William Cullen Bryant II; Thomas G. Voss et al. | Go to book overview
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Bryant Chronology
1794-1836
1794. William Cullen Bryant born November 3 to Dr. Peter and Sarah Snell Bryant
at Cummington, Massachusetts.
1798. June, enters district school.
1802. Begins to compose verses.
1807. March 18, first published poem in Hampshire Gazette.
1808. June, "The Embargo; or Sketches of the Times: A Satire. By a Youth of
Thirteen," published in Boston. November, begins college preparation in
Latin under uncle, Rev. Thomas Snell, at North Brookfield, Massachusetts.
1809. February, "The Embargo," second edition with other poems, Boston. July, re-
turns to Cummington. August to October, studies Greek with Rev. Moses
Hallock at Plainfield, Massachusetts.
1810. Spring, studies mathematics with Hallock. October, enters sophomore class at
Williams College.
1811. May, returns to Cummington. July 9, receives honorable dismissal from Wil-
liams. December, begins law study with Samuel Howe at Worthington, Massa-
chusetts. Composes verses on love and death, 1811-1815.
1814. June, continues law study with Congressman William Baylies at West Bridge-
water, Massachusetts. November--December, ill at Cummington.
1815. July, completes "To a Waterfowl." August, admitted to practice law in Massa-
chusetts Court of Common Pleas; returns to Cummington. Autumn, writes
first, incomplete draft of "Thanatopsis." December, begins law practice at
Plainfield.
1816. July, appointed lieutenant in Massachusetts militia. August, leaves law prac-
tice at Plainfield. October, enters partnership at Great Barrington, Massachu-
setts, with George Ives. December, meets Frances Fairchild.
1817. February, resigns lieutenancy in militia. May, Bryant-Ives partnership dis-
solved; enters solitary practice. September, "Thanatopsis" and other verses
published anonymously in North American Review. Admitted to practice in
Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court.
1818. March, "To a Waterfowl" in NAR. June, visits New York City. July, pub-
lishes criticism of Solyman Brown verse Essay on American Poetry in NAR.
1819. June, essay "On the Happy Temperament" in NAR. September, given hon-
orary M.A. by Williams; essay "On the Use of Trisyllabic Feet in Iambic
Verse" in NAR.
1820. February, elected town clerk of Great Barrington. March, death of Dr. Peter
Bryant. May, appointed justice of the peace. July 4, gives oration at Stock-
bridge, Massachusetts, on Missouri Compromise. August, contributes five hymns
to Unitarian hymnal to be published in New York. October, notice of James Hillhouse's Percy's Masque in NAR. December, appointed to seven-year term
as justice of the peace, Berkshire County.
1821. January 11, marries Frances Fairchild at Great Barrington. April, appointed
clerk of center school district, Great Barrington. August, reads Phi Beta Kappa
poem, "The Ages," at Harvard commencement. September, Poems published
at Cambridge. Contributes poems to Richard Dana's periodical, The Idle
Man
.
1822. January 2, daughter Frances (Fanny) born. cFebruary--March, Bryant's 1821
Poems reprinted at London in William Roscoe Specimens of the American

-6-

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