The Letters of William Cullen Bryant - Vol. 1

By William Cullen Bryant II; Thomas G. Voss et al. | Go to book overview

rangue upon such subjects that I could not well refuse him--but stipulated that it should appear without my name. It was notwithstanding by some mistake or misunderstanding printed as the production of Wm C. Bryant to which was carefully subjoined, Attorney at Law. 7

I remain your affectionate Son
WILLIAM C. BRYANT

MANUSCRIPTS: NYPL-GR (final and draft) ADDRESS: Hon. Peter Bryant/ Cummington PUBLISHED (in part): Life, I, 153-154.

1.
Though Dr. Bryant's letters are unrecovered, undated quotations in Life, I, 152-153 seem to be portions of one or both of these.
2.
Peter Bryant had passed on to Cullen Willard Phillips' request that he interest his son in noticing for the NAR a recently published versified survey of ancient and modern poetry. "I think it is a very good subject for Cullen," Phillips remarked; "Let him if he has the means give a short history of and criticism on our poetry." Letter dated February 14, 1818, in NYPL-BG. The book was Solyman Brown, An Essay on American Poetry . . . ( New Haven, 1818).
3.
In the first draft of this letter Cullen added here, "after having been accustomed all my life to have access to very respectable libraries."
4.
These poets were, in the order listed: Timothy Dwight ( 1752-1817), John Trumbull ( 1750-1831), Joel Barlow ( 1754-1812), David Humphreys ( 1752-1818), Robert Treat Paine ( 1773-1811), William Cliffton ( 1772-1799), Saint John Honeywood ( 1763-1798), Lemuel Hopkins ( 1750-1801), Philip Freneau ( 1752-1832), Francis Hopkinson ( 1737-1791), Sarah Wentworth Morton ( 1759-1846), Mercy Otis Warren ( 1728- 1814), Joseph Brown Ladd ( 1764-1786), and Benjamin Church ( 1734-1776).
5.
The Monthly Magazine and American Review ( 1799- 1800).
6.
["Address on the Bible"] Berkshire Star, Stockbridge, January 29, 1818.
7.
Rev. Elijah Wheeler ( 1774-1827) was pastor of the Congregational Church at Great Barrington from 1806 to 1823. Taylor, History of Great Barrington, p. 343. Bryant's evaluation of this speech, given before the Auxiliary Bible Society of Great Barrington on January 1, 1818, was probably just; it was a perfunctory performance aimed at an orthodox audience, notable only for its early hint of the religious toleration which would later characterize his writing and speaking. For its full text, see "Youth," pp. 276-284.

49. To Willard Phillips

Great Barrington 13 Apl. [1818]

Yours of the 2d. I received on the 11th instant-- 1 I had undertaken to write the article you speak of but it will not be possible on account of some arrangements which I have made to have it ready by the middle of May--I can get it to you probably by the first of June--if that should not be soon enough to insert it in the number for July it can perhaps be. deferred. 2 In that case it will not be necessary to have it so early as June--and if you will be good enough to inform me I will keep it longer on my hands and make it more fit to be read-- 3 I think if your work sustains its present character it will soon acquire a reputation not easily to be: shaken--A good review has been a desideratum in our literature

-81-

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