The Letters of William Cullen Bryant - Vol. 1

By William Cullen Bryant II; Thomas G. Voss et al. | Go to book overview

MANUSCRIPT: NYPL-GR (incomplete draft) TEXT: New York Spectator, September 21, 1821.

1.
The daily New York Commercial Advertiser had as its semi-weekly edition the New York Spectator, in which this letter was printed.
2.
Bryant occasionally used the initial Y in later anonymous writings. See, for example, Letter86.

76. To Willard Phillips

Great Barrington Oct 1st 1821.

Dear Sir--

I send you my critique on the Idle Man. 1 I hope it is not too late. --Since I returned there has been a Term of the Supreme Court in this County whic[h] lasted a fortnight and at which by good luck I had a little business--and another of the Court of Sessions--and the second No. of the Idle Man got carried off by somebody and it was some time before I could get it again &c. &c.--all which must be my apology for the delay. --The review I submit to your revision. --Draw your pen through any part you please, without mercy, and interline where you please. --Will you be so good as to see that about a dozen copies or more of my poems are reserved for me to give my friends.--

Yours sincerely--
WM. C. BRYANT

MANUSCRIPT: MHS ADDRESS: Willard Phillips Esq--.

1.
This critical notice, written for the NAR at Dana's request, was not published therein because, in Dana's words, his "enemies" among the members of the "Club" ( Edward Everett in particular) asked Phillips to "qualify or omit the praise, & retain the censure." Dana to Phillips, December 2, 1821, MHS; 78.1.

77. To Gulian C. Verplanck1

Great Barrington Oct. 10, 1821.

Sir--

Yours of the 4th inst together with the N. Y. American of the same date and a copy of your Anniversary Discourse 2 have just reached me.

I had before seen the greater part of your Discourse in the shape of extracts, in various publications, but I am happy in an opportunity to read, in its original connection, the whole of a work the free and liberal spirit of which, to say nothing of its other merits too generally acknowledged to need any testimony of mine, had already so much interested me.

Whether you think highly of my poems or otherwise I hope at least that you think more of them than I was able to find in the paper you sent me. On unfolding it I found the two inside pages entirely blank--through some blunder, I suppose, of the press. I conclude however from the intimation in your letter that the notice was a favourable one, and I am

-113-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Letters of William Cullen Bryant - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 506

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.