The Letters of William Cullen Bryant - Vol. 1

By William Cullen Bryant II; Thomas G. Voss et al. | Go to book overview

but he has not sent them to this state, nor is it expected that he will. Both they and he are somewhere in your state, and it is likely will not soon be seen here. Stevens it seems owed debts to a considerable amount, and both he and Deming have mutually been security for each other.

Such are the particulars as far as I have been able to learn them. It was impossible to secure any thing on your demand; the first news of Deming's failure being after the assignment of his property.--

I hope you may be able to get something of them in your State-- though they will probably attempt to keep their property as much under cover as they can--

I am Gentlemen
Yrs. Respectfully
WM C BRYANT

MANUSCRIPT: NYPL-GR ADDRESS: Messrs. Robt Southwick & Co / Merchants/ Poughkeepsie / N. Y. POSTMARK (in script): Great Barrington December 31st POSTAL ANNOTATION: 12½ ENDORSED: W. C. Bryant / 12 Mo. 27th 1823 / answered 2 Mo.--12th 1824.

1.
This and Letters 96 and 98 concerning the same case are together representative of the kind of litigation in which Bryant was mostly involved during nearly nine years of law practice at Great Barrington. Robert B. Southwick and his brothers, Edward C. and Willet H. Southwick, operated a tannery on the Hudson River shore at Poughkeepsie, New York. James H. Smith, History of Dutchess County, New York ( Syracuse, 1882), p. 392. No other record of this case has been found.

94. To Theophilus Parsons1

Great Barrington Dec 29 1823.

Dear Sir.

I have just received your of the 19th. --The proposal contained in it is of too flattering a nature not to be accepted, at the same time that my circumstances do not permit me to decline the pecuniary compensation you offer. 2

As to the amount of this compensation, I am not sufficiently acquainted with the price which literary wares bear in market to form any judgment. If I were to say that I leave [it] wholly to your generosity, I should show myself destitute of that quality--for you might then be induced to give too much through fear of giving too little. I will not therefore leave it to be settled exactly in that way. You say that you are offered terms which put it in your power to pay for what assistance you want, and that you have engaged the support of some of the best writers in Boston and its vicinity. 3 Let the compensation you allow me be proportioned to what you allow others, and such as the terms offered you by your publishers enable you easily to make, and whatever it may be, I

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