The Letters of William Cullen Bryant - Vol. 1

By William Cullen Bryant II; Thomas G. Voss et al. | Go to book overview

munication with them makes its progress among us so slow that we are sometimes ready to fear that i[t]s general diffusion here is a blessing reserved for the next generation. If the doings of your meeting are published in the news papers or in any of the periodical religious publications we shall see them of course--if not we hope that some way will be taken to communicate the results to the Unitarians of Berkshire.

[unsigned]

MANUSCRIPT: NYPL-GR (draft) ADDRESS: Revd Henry Ware--D. D.

1.
Henry Ware ( 1764-1845, Harvard 1785), professor of theology at the Harvard Divinity School, was one of the principal founders of Unitarianism in this country.
2.
On December 29, 1824, Ware, Alden Bradford, and Richard Sullivan invited Bryant, as one "known to take a deep interest in religion," to confer at Boston "on the expediency of appointing an annual meeting for the purpose of union, sympathy, & cooperation in the cause of Christian truth & Christian charity." NYPL-BG. In all likelihood the invitation resulted from Bryant's careful analysis for Andrews Norton, in Letter 90, of the state of religion in Berkshire County.

118. To Messrs. H. C. Carey & I. Lea1

Great Barrington Jan. 15 1825

Gentlemen,

I am very sensible of the compliment you pay me in applying to me as a contributor to your new work along with authors so celebrated as those whom you mention in a letter 〈of the 5 inst.〉 which I have just received from you. 2

You may consider me as a contributor, in my way, that of verse I mean, to the work.

As to the matter of compensation I am too poor to work for nothing and we have a great modern authority for the maxim, that a man ought to be paid as well for the sweat of his brains as that of his brow.

I do not however wish to fix upon any definite compensa[tion] myself. --I am willing to leave it to you to judge of the value of the articles I shall send you & shall be content with whatever amount you shall think I ought to receive.-- 3

Your obt servt
WM C BRYANT

P. S. I shall expect to receive a copy of the work.

W C BRY'T.

MANUSCRIPT: NYPL-GR (draft).

1.
Henry C. Carey ( 1793-1879) and his brother-in-law Isaac Lea ( 1792-1886) were partners in a highly successful Philadelphia publishing firm ( 1821-1851).
2.
This work was the first American gift annual, The Atlantic Souvenir: A Christmas and New Year's Offering. 1826 ( Philadelphia, 1826). Other writers in the first volume were James Kirke Paulding and Catharine Sedgwick. Carey and Lea's letter is unrecovered.

-170-

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