Please update your browser

You're using a version of Internet Explorer that isn't supported by Questia.
To get a better experience, go to one of these sites and get the latest
version of your preferred browser:

The Letters of William Cullen Bryant - Vol. 1

By William Cullen Bryant II; Thomas G. Voss et al. | Go to book overview

time I am not plagued with the disagreeable disgusting drudgery of the law--and what is still better am aloof from those miserable feuds and wranglings that make Great Barrington an unpleasant residence, even to him who tries every method in his power to avoid them.

If you have any time to spare I think you would do well to set about platting your name on every article of clothing that you are likely to have washed here. Last Saturday my laundress came with my linen and brought one cravat two pairs of stockings and a flannel wrapper that did not belong to me and I found that two cravats of my own and two pairs of stockings were missing. I sent her away with the things that did not belong to me, and have not seen her since, though it has been her usual practice to call Monday morning to take my dirty linen--and it is now five o'clock in the afternoon. I do not expect however to lose them, for she seems to be a very honest old lady, washes at the reasonable rate of 50 cents the dozen, and was sent to me by Miss Sedgwick who was kind enough to look her out for me.--

I am very glad that Frances makes such progress in learning to read, land you must tell her that when I see her again I shall expect that she will be able to read any where in Cobwebs]. 5 Mr Ward has called for the letter.--

Good bye
yrs affectionately
W C BRYANT

MANUSCRIPT: NYPL-GR ADDRESS: Mrs. Frances F. Bryant/ Cummington/ Mass/ W Ward Esq. PUBLISHED (in part): Life, I, 219.

1.
See 95.3.
2.
Egbert Nelson Fairchild ( 1802?-1864) was the youngest of Frances Bryant's nine brothers and sisters.
3.
After Bryant left Great Barrington William, son of David Leavenworth, built a dam and mill near the grove of which the poet had written in "Green River," "And the plane-tree's speckled arms o'ershoot / The swifter current that mines its root." Taylor, Great Barrington, p. 358. See Poems ( 1876), p. 33.
4.
Daniel Webster's speech at the dedication of the Bunker Hill Monument on June 17, 1825, was the subject of an article by Bryant in NYR, I ( August 1825), 214- 219.
5.
The lines between supplied brackets are in block print, presumably for little Fanny's eye. "Cobwebs" is unidentified.

135. To George Bancroft1

New York 28 June 1825.

My dear Sir

I yesterday received your beautiful translation of Goethe's ballad. We shall venture to print it--there is nothing in it with which true delicacy can be offended. I have however ventured to take the liberty you

-193-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Letters of William Cullen Bryant - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 506

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.