The Letters of William Cullen Bryant - Vol. 1

By William Cullen Bryant II; Thomas G. Voss et al. | Go to book overview
exceedingly sorry to have had you answer the proposition in any other manner. It was contrary to the spirit of the agreement by which the works were united, . . . and if I had been here when the proposition was about to be made I should have protested against [it] most vehemently, as alike impudent in its nature, and hostile to the interest of all parties." NYPL-BG.
5.
G. and C. Carvill had agreed to be the New York publishers and distributors of the United States Review and Literary Gazette, as the new journal would be called.
6.
Bryant had recently taken his wife and daughter from Orange Springs, New Jersey, where they had boarded for a month, to Cummington. Frances Bryant, "Autobiographical Sketch," NYPL-GR.
7.
In his July 30 letter, Carter assured Bryant, "I believe I have convinced Mr. G. that the condition proposed by Mr. Folsom would be prejudicial to his interest and to the interest of all concerned. And I do not think any more such propositions will be made." The matter seems to have rested here, for in spite of their growing differences of opinion during the ensuing year, Bryant and Folsom ran the USR on. the terms agreed to earlier.

145. To Frances F. Bryant

New York July 29 1826.

My dear Frances.

I am obliged to you for your letter notwithstanding there was some obscurity in certain passages. On the evening of your arrival at Great Barrington, you say that you walked up to Hopkins and back again. Now the greatness of this exploit you will please to observe depends entirely on the place where Hopkins was when you walked up to him--if for instance he was only the other side of the room it was a very little matter --if he was at his house it was fetching a considerable walk. 1

But leaving the solution of this knotty point until we have an opportunity to discuss it verbally I proceed to mention that I have been a little unwell since I wrote you last. 2 I was then somewhat out of order with what I thought a pretty hard cold--but the next day I had a head ache and fever and a strong desire to take medicine which I indulged, and in a day or two began to get better and am now nearly as well as usual. You may believe this when I tell you that yesterday I went to Communipaw and in the evening to the opera. Communipaw as you may perhaps know is the oldest settlement in these parts except New York. It lies southwest of Paulus Hook and consists of about half a dozen low stone Dutch houses ranged along the shore, the inmates of which talk Dutch yet. We went into one of the houses, a girl had just finished churning. She gave the party some buttermilk--a delicacy of which you know I am not particularly fond. We saw nothing else except a young negro about two years old in "mudder's nakedness," as the Irish say. As to the Opera I was pleased--more so than I expected to be. The piece was Don Giovanni, a well known plot borrowed from the Spanish I think by Molière, and since reproduced in a great many dramatic forms. 3 The hero, Don Giovanni Don Juan or Don John, marries all the wives he can

-206-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Letters of William Cullen Bryant - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 506

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.