The Letters of William Cullen Bryant - Vol. 1

By William Cullen Bryant II; Thomas G. Voss et al. | Go to book overview
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2.
The Columbian Centinel, for which Bryant had written a notice of Dana The Idle Man in 1822 (Letter 86).
3.
Manuscript torn.

150. To Charles Folsom1

Cummington Sept 11 1826.

My dear Sir

I send you an article for the Miscellany and a piece of poetry. 2 I had another poetical article sent to me on which I had bestowed a good deal of labour but I cannot find it to send with this. Perhaps I may send you another of my own in season for the Oct No.

I wish that whatever is sent to me during my residence in Cummingtoin by mail, may be directed to be left at the Post Office in Worthington. I shall then get it earlier.

I shall be glad to hear from you and from the Review.

Yrs truly
W C BRYANT

MANUSCRIPT: HEHL ADDRESS: Mr. Charles Folsom / Editor of the U. S. Review / Care of Harrison Gray/ Boston POSTMARK (in script): [ Worthing?]ton Ms POSTAL ANNOTATION: [1/2?] oz 75.

1.
See Letter 144. The NYR having ceased publication with the May number, Bryant had served as a nominal editor, first with James G. Carter and later with Charles Folsom, of the USLG while its fourth volume was being completed with the July, August, and September numbers. The new joint publication, the United States Review and Literary Gazette, began publication on October 1.
2.
Bryant prose tale, "A Border Tradition," USR, 1 ( October 1826), 40-53, and his verse translation, "Mary Magdalen" (see 151.1).

151. To Charles Folsom

Cummington Sept. 14 1826

My dear Sir.

I did not get your letter of the eighth until last evening. I had previously sent on an article for the Miscellany and some lines from the Spanish. I wish you to make a correction in the title of the latter. Instead of To Mary Magdalen--let it be Mary Magdalen--otherwise I am afraid that those who are not well versed in Scripture History on reading the title may expect a copy of amatory verses addressed to some Mary or other. 1

I send you a critical notice and some more poetry for the Oct. No. 2 I supposed that I had already contributed my proportion to the Sept. No and that the account of the N Y Lyceum would go into the Oct. No. 3 As it seems this has not been convenient I fear my contributions for this No will not amount to my 20 pages. If I could get at new books I could soon dish up Critical Notices enough to make out the quantity but in my situation it is not easy to get at these. I told Mr. Carvill to send me

-213-

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