The Letters of William Cullen Bryant - Vol. 1

By William Cullen Bryant II; Thomas G. Voss et al. | Go to book overview

173. To Richard H. Dana

New York June 1. 1827.

My dear Sir

There was no occasion for so much spirit in your last letter--the one previous had moved my bowels, and I would have done what you desired immediately if I could. I am now quite well and the first moment I was able I finished the examination of your work. 1 I should however apologize. I have a good deal of work to do. I drudge for the Evening Post, and labour for the Review, and thus have a pretty busy life of it. I would give up one of these if I could earn my bread by the other, but that I cannot do. I have delayed attending to your manuscript, from time to time just as I often delay writing poetry, until I should feel able to do it better justice. I have delayed it too long, but it was not from mere laziness.

You are mistaken in supposing the poem did not take well with me. I think very highly of it. It has passages of great power and great beauty, and the general effect to my apprehension is very fine. Did you tell me not to show it? I cannot find the letter which accompanied the manuscript and I may have sinned, for I have shown it to Verplanck who thinks highly of it, and we have agreed that it should be printed.

As for the mode of publication, I would get the booksellers interested if possible in the sale. But these gentry pay nothing for manuscript works, at least they do not in New York unless the previous reputation of the author makes the sale sure. Generally booksellers here are not willing to undertake any risk. The old race of booksellers who did these things, such as Wiley & Eastburn2 have passed away and their successors are careful men who do what is called safe business. There is now a great deal more bookselling enterprize in either Boston or Philadelphia than here. If you could get a bookseller to publish at his own risk and allow you a certain portion of the profits I should think it the best way. But you must not expect to make a great deal of money by a first poetical publication, and then if you should you will be agreeably disappointed.

It is difficult to judge in what manner the public will receive your work. I believe the reception will be respectful. I hope it will be cordial, but fashion has a great deal to do with these things, and though there is a better taste for poetry in this country than there was ten years ago, there are yet a great many who count the syllables on their fingers e. g. Mr. [Robert] Walsh and all that class of men. But we will try what we can do for it.

I have not marked quite all the passages which I thought required amendment, because I was not certain where the fault lay. There is occasionally a startling abruptness in the style, and Matt is treated by the poet who relates the story with a sort of fierce familiarity which is sometimes carried too far. If I have thus, both here and in the notes I have made, dwelt upon the blemishes it is not because they are more numerous

-241-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Letters of William Cullen Bryant - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 506

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.