The Letters of William Cullen Bryant - Vol. 1

By William Cullen Bryant II; Thomas G. Voss et al. | Go to book overview

V
Fellow in the Arts
1828-1831
(LETTERS 195 TO 222)

THE YEARS FROM 1828 TO 1831 were as happy as any Bryant had ever enjoyed and, despite growing responsibility for his newspaper, as carefree. Through his active part in the programs of the New York Athenaeum and the National Academy of Design, and his collaboration with writers and artists in preparing the successive Talisman volumes, he assumed a central role in the city's cultural life. And his fondness for satire, indulged as a youth in "The Embargo," and as a village lawyer in newspaper essays and in his farce "The Heroes," found targets among the city's fashionables in "The Legend of the Devil's Pulpit," published in The Talisman, and in jeux d'esprit in the Evening Post, such as a verse lampoon of Fanny Wright and repeated spoofs of editorial opponents.

As the second Talisman appeared at the close of 1828, its creators formalized their association in a "Sketch Club," or "Twenty-One," which provided convivial gatherings at the homes of its members in rotation, at which they exercised their artistic skills and put together another edition of their annual. The club's intimacy as well as its secrecy were fostered by its limitation to twenty-one members and its obscure announcements of weekly meetings published among the obituaries in the Evening Post. Its gatherings were for the most part frolicsome, with serio-comic themes proposed by the host for varied expression in sketches, verses, or prose articles. But its members also collaborated in more serious projects. Among these were a third Talisman early in 1830, and at the end of that year The American Landscape, a volume of landscape paintings by Cole, Durand, Weir, and others, engraved by Durand and accompanied by letterpress written by Bryant, and in 1832 two volumes of stories by Bryant, Leggett, Paulding, Sands, and Catharine Sedgwick, called Tales of Glauber-Spa.

Bryant's appreciation of other arts was likewise quickened by friendships with their practitioners. Lorenzo Da Ponte and Manuel Garcia drew him to the Italian opera and the oratorio, which led him to review their performances in the Post. He found a warm friend in the young tragedian Edwin Forrest; when Forrest offered a prize in 1829 for the best play on an American aboriginal theme, Bryant headed the committee which chose John Stone Metamora, providing Forrest with his most popular starring vehicle. The following year Bryant chaired a similar group which selected James Kirke Paulding The Lion of the West for the comedian James Hackett, who found, in Nimrod Wildfire, his most enduring role.

When the Evening Post's veteran conductor William Coleman died in July 1829 Bryant became at once the editor-in-chief, soon engaging as his assistant William Leggett, magazine editor and writer of tales, poems, and the

-260-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Letters of William Cullen Bryant - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 506

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.