The Letters of William Cullen Bryant - Vol. 1

By William Cullen Bryant II; Thomas G. Voss et al. | Go to book overview

It however had the effect of disgusting them with Blunt if they were not disgusted before. The letters published to day, particularly Mr. McDuffie's will set the matter right. The anti-auction party are making a great noise here but I am not certain that they are very strong; although a good many of them are valuable subscribers to newspapers. They are however the only party that show any activity or make any clamour. When you get here you will be able to judge better than I can. For my part I think that both they and Mr. McDuffie are clearly in the wrong--but we of the Post have thought it prudent to take no part in the controversy. 1

The demand for the Talisman continues--and you must do your share for another year. Inman has a design illustrating Moore's poem of the Dismal swamp which I hear spoken highly of, and which he wishes engraved for the Talisman. Will you pick up from the Virginians some particulars of the Dismal Swamp while you are at Washington which some of us may weave into a narrative or make a florid description out of? 2

yrs truly
W C BRYANT

MANUSCRIPT: NYPL-Berg ADDRESS: Hon Gulian C. Verplanck / Member of Congress / Washington / D. C. POSTMARK: NEW-YORK / MAY / 10 POSTAL ANNOTATION: FREE DOCKETED: W. C. Bryant.

1.
George McDuffie ( 1790-1851) of South Carolina (see 88.3) was the leading Southern proponent of free trade in the House of Representatives; Joseph Blunt (see 177.4) was a high-tariff man. The letters and articles referred to concerned the national debate preceding the passage by Congress that month of the "Tariff of Abominations." See 196.8. The auction of cheap foreign goods imported at a low rate of duty, a state- licensed monopoly, had by 1828 become so obnoxious to conventional New York merchants that an anti-auction movement of prominent New York City businessmen entered a slate of congressional candidates against Democratic Congressmen Cambreleng and Verplanck. See Walter Hugins, Jacksonian Democracy and the Working Class: A Study of the New York Workingmen's Movement 1829-1837 (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1960), pp. 150-151.
2.
Henry Inman ( 1801-1846), popular portrait and figure painter, was from its inception in 1826 until 1830 vice president of the National Academy of Design. He did six illustrations for the three Talisman volumes. His "The Dismal Swamp," engraved by Peter Maverick, accompanied Verplanck's article of the same title in The Talisman for MDCCCXXIX, facing p. 255.

201. To Cyrus Bryant1

[ New York, June 12, 1828]

Dear Brother

I sent on your boxes to Hartford day before yesterday. The freight to [ N. Y. was] $1.00 the cartage to Thorburn's $.25 and the cartage to the steamboat $.25. I went to Thorburn's on that morning and found them just arrived. I directed them as you requested.

-269-

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