The Letters of William Cullen Bryant - Vol. 1

By William Cullen Bryant II; Thomas G. Voss et al. | Go to book overview

what I said until more than a week after it appeared notwithstanding the Philadelphia Inquirer endeavored to call him out by hoping that I did not mean to accuse Mr. Walsh of plagiarism. I sent the Evening Post containing my article, immediately to Wigglesworth one of the editors of the Encyclopedia Americana whom I know. It is possible that some communication between him and Walsh occasioned the article in the National Gazette. It appears after all that the life of Barlow was imposed upon the editors of the Encyclop Am as original and that Mr. Walsh's conduct was nothing better than downright theft. The most amusing part of his apology is the passage where he intimates that when he sent the article to Boston he had forgotten that he did not write it himself. Scarcely less curious however is the part where he infers that as the biographer cannot make lives he has a right to steal lives written by other men.

Of Mr. Herbert whom you still speak with so much affection I have nothing good to tell you. I am I must confess a little inclined to think that the old gentleman had better give up publishing any more for the present. To write three thick volumes, and get little cash and less circulation, is not certainly very encouraging.

There is talk of establishing an evening paper here to support the cause of the Tammany Society. The editor is to be Mr. Hagedorn of the Newark Intelligencer. You may have seen his prospectus or advertisement.--

Yrs truly
W. C. BRYANT

MANUSCRIPT: NYPL-Berg ADDRESS: Hon. G. C. Verplanck / Member of Congress / Washington / D. C. POSTMARK: NEW-YORK / MAY / 21 POSTAL ANNOTATION: FREE DOCKETED: W. C. Bryant.

1.
Bryant's earlier letter is unrecovered. Perhaps Mr. Dodge was David Low Dodge ( 1774-1852), a New York dry-goods merchant and founder, in 1815, of the New York Peace Society. White is unidentified.
2.
Verplanck had published a "Sketch of the Life and Writings of Joel Barlow" in the Analectic Magazine, 4 ( August 1814), 130-158. See July, Essential New Yorker, p. 291.

219. To Thomas Cole1

New York June 15 1830.

My dear Sir,

I take the liberty, I hope it is no improper one, of introducing to your acquaintance Mr. William Cox of this city, the bearer of this letter, a gentleman of talent and merits. He has been for some time past connected with the New York Mirror in which his articles under the signature of C. have attracted much attention. An arrangement has been made by which he is henceforth to devote his whole time to that publication, and during his absence in Europe will write for it in the character of a

-294-

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