The Letters of William Cullen Bryant - Vol. 1

By William Cullen Bryant II; Thomas G. Voss et al. | Go to book overview

going on with a party from Massachusetts I question very much whether he would gain any thing by it. If he is going to settle there he had better not trammel himself with any connections of the sort but settle where he can find the best situation. If he should come this way with you he might take the money of Miss Robbins as he went along. 5 He will find the waters all open, and the roads will be settled by the time he gets down. But if he waits for the [ Erie] canal to open he must delay his journey for several weeks yet. I do not say this because I would have you wait for John in case he should conclude on going this way. On the contrary I hope you will not, for if you are late it will spoil your visit and Frances by what I can learn intends to leave the city early. 6

W. C. B.

A steam-boat went up to Poughkeepsie on Saturday and returned yesterday. The ice is cracking and the water rising every where in the neighborhood of Hudson, Albany and Troy.

MANUSCRIPT: BCHS ADDRESS: Mrs. Sarah S. Bryant / Cummington / Mass. POSTMARK: NEW-YORK / MAR / [14] POSTAL ANNOTATION: PAID 37½ / double-paid.

1.
Michael Faraday, Chemical Manipulations ( London, 1827).
2.
Probably Carlos A. Waite ( 1800-1866), then a first lieutenant in the United States Army, who later distinguished himself in the war with Mexico, retiring in 1865 as a brigadier general. William H. Powell, List of Officers of the Army of the United States from 1779 to 1900 ( New York: Hamersley, 1900), p. 650. Since neither Bryant's letter of inquiry nor Waite's reply has been recovered, it is uncertain what employment Cullen was trying to secure for his brother--perhaps on War Department construction in the West.
3.
Adeline Plummer Bryant, Austin's wife, and Charity Louisa, Cullen's sister.
4.
William Leggett had lived as a youth in the village of Edwardsville, Illinois. Shawneetown was not far above that place on the Ohio River. Proctor, "Leggett," p. 241. John Howard Bryant, Cullen's youngest brother, was planning to join his next older brother Peter Rush as a homesteader on the prairie at Jacksonville, in west- central Illinois. Cullen mistakenly wrote "Legget," and "Shauneetown."
5.
In late March John brought his mother to New York City, from which he left on April 18 for Illinois by way of the Hudson River, the Erie Canal, and overland, reaching Jacksonville about May 23. Brown, John Howard Bryant, p. 17.
6.
During Sarah Bryant's visit Cullen and his family moved from Broome Street to rooms at Fourth Street and Broadway. On June 1 Frances and Fanny returned with her to the Cummington homestead, where Frances gave birth to her second daughter, Julia Sands Bryant, on June 29. Frances Bryant, "Autobiographical Sketch," NYPL-GR.

222. To the Readers of the EVENING POST1

New York, April 21, 1831.

It is with the greatest reluctance that I obtrude anything relating to my personal concerns on the public. I observe, however, in last evening's Commercial, a false account under the signature of William L. Stone, of an affair between myself and him, which took place yesterday. Lest my

-299-

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