The Letters of William Cullen Bryant - Vol. 1

By William Cullen Bryant II; Thomas G. Voss et al. | Go to book overview

Besides if the rest of us are not on the look out Paulding will fill the whole book.

Did you receive some papers in relation to Garcia's case? Will you let me know how it stands at present.--2

Yrs truly W. C. BRYANT

MANUSCRIPT: NYPL-Berg ADDRESS: Hon. G. C. Verplanck /Member of Congress/ Washington / D. C. POSTMARK: [illegible] POSTAL ANNOTATION: FREE DOCKETED: W. C. Bryant.

1.
Early in 1832 Samuel F. B. Morse wrote to Verplanck, from Paris, a disconsolate letter asking whether there was still any hope that he might be commissioned to paint one or more historical pictures for the National Capitol: "I have too long lived in the hope. . . . I have studied and travelled to prepare myself, I have made sacrifices of feeling and of pecuniary interests buoyed up with this phantom of hope which is daily growing dimmer and will soon vanish." Quoted in Oliver W. Larkin, Samuel F. B. Morse and American Democratic Art ( Boston and Toronto: Little, Brown, 1954), p. 106. See Letter 203 for Bryant's effort more than three years earlier to secure such a commission for Morse, through Verplanck's influence.
2.
Garcia and his case are unidentified, but see Letter 253, which apparently concerns the same subject.

236. To Gulian C. Verplanck

N York March 30, 1832

Dear Sir

The Sketch Club1 have voted to have an Annual, --something more splendid than any which has yet appeared in this country. There are to be six copper plate engravings of larger size than is common in the American annuals--and several more cuts by Mason for head and tail- pieces. 2 The book is to have a larger page than any other of our Annuals, and but half the matter. Harper is to be asked to publish it--Durand has engaged to superintend the embellishments, and you are to be asked to undertake the superintendence of the literary part. 3 The plan appears to have been got up by Ingham, 4 Durand and Weir, 5 who are full of zeal about it. The corresponding Secretary of the Club was, according to a vote, to write to you on the subject; but as I have been asked and have consented to do it in his stead, you will dispense with that formality. 6 Write me whether you will undertake the business.

Am I right in supposing your friend Barnwell to be the author of the article in the Southern Review on my poems? 7

The authors of the "Book" are suitably vexed and disappointed that you should write nothing for it--and there are loud threats of lugging your name into the preface or some other part of the book, en revanche.

Dr. DeKay came into the office the other day with a Turkish salutation accompanied with an appropriate gesture. Having had an attack of the cholera he is as much a lion here--the joke is his own--as the man

-322-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Letters of William Cullen Bryant - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 506

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.