The Letters of William Cullen Bryant - Vol. 1

By William Cullen Bryant II; Thomas G. Voss et al. | Go to book overview
connection with their study of French. The horses here, of course, have gone to the Black Hawk War.
2.
Six weeks earlier Arthur Bryant had married, at Richmond, Massachusetts, Henrietta B. Plummer, sister of his brother Austin's wife Adeline, and of Congressman Franklin E. Plummer of Mississippi. Sarah to Cyrus Bryant, May 8, 1832, BCHS. See 232.12.
3.
Cyrus reached Jacksonville on July 6, two weeks after Cullen had left for home. See Letter 248.
4.
An undated, unsigned memorandum in NYPL-GR, which is in all likelihood the one referred to, reads: "Mr. Bryant will go to Guyandotte and from there take the stage to Lewisburgh, at Lewisburgh he will leave the main route and take that which goes by Fincastle the Sweetspring and the Natural Bridge. The Natural Bridge is between Fincastle & Lexington about 12 miles from the latter. Mr. Bryant's best plan will be to stop at what is called the Natural Bridge tavern distant one mile & a half from the Bridge the tavern is on the stage road-- On the morning that Mr. B. leaves what are called the Falls of the Kenhawa he will enquire from the driver of the stage the exact distance from the 'Falls' to the pass or Cliff on the River. I think it is about 9 miles; the drivers when requested always stop to let passengers visit this fine scene."
5.
Although, for the rest of his life, Bryant was an insatiable traveler, he never went farther west than this.
6.
The Italian violinist Nicolò Paganini ( 1782-1840), whose virtuosity was by this time legendary.
7.
Near the present Crystal City, in Jefferson County, Missouri.
8.
In his haste to rejoin his family after learning of the cholera epidemic in New York, Bryant seems to have by-passed the Natural Bridge. See the accounts of his itinerary in Letters 248 and 249.

248. To Mrs. Sarah S. Bryant

New York August 23 1832

Dear Mother,

I got back to New York on the 12th of July having been absent on my western journey between seven and eight weeks, nearly three of which were passed in Illinois. I went in the first place to Baltimore, whence I proceeded to Wheeling on the Ohio, travelling for the greater part of the way, through the state of Maryland. At Wheeling I took a steamboat for Cincinnati, where I staid two days. From Cincinnati I went to Louisville in Kentucky and there I took passage for St. Louis in Missouri. At St. Louis I was detained a day and a half. I then went up the Illinois in a steam boat to Naples twenty miles from Jacksonville, whence I was conveyed in a carriage to my place of destination. I found John well. He was at work on Arthur's farm; he had bought a yoke of oxen and various implements for the purpose and had planted a field of corn which like most of the corn planted in Illinois, had not come up very well--about a third of the hills having no plants in them. He planted it over while I was there, but the crows pulled up nearly half of what was planted a second time. The corn is late in all Illinois, but as a great deal of ground is Planted with it this year, there will be a large supply provided the frosts

-355-

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