The Letters of William Cullen Bryant - Vol. 1

By William Cullen Bryant II; Thomas G. Voss et al. | Go to book overview
4.
Unrecovered.
5.
Through a complex series of transactions between November 14 and December 1, 1832, Thomas Gill and Hetty Coleman, the founder's widow, retired from ownership in the EP, leaving Bryant, Leggett, and Charles Burnham, son of the former business manager, as equal partners. This was effected through a $7,000 loan from Congressman Churchill Cambreleng, which was secured by a mortgage on the paper. See "Evening Post Accounts," NYPL-GR.
6.
Neither the occasion for, nor the amount of, Mrs. Bryant's debt to her daughter Sally's widower, now remarried, has been determined.
7.
Roswell Hawkes (d. 1870) had succeeded the first Cummington minister, James Briggs ( 1745-1825), and ran a "select school" at Cummington attended in 1826-1827 by John Bryant. Later Hawkes taught at Mount Holyoke Female Seminary after its founding in 1836 by Mary Lyon. See Brown, John Howard Bryant, p. 13; Only One Cummington, p. 399.
8.
Robert Charles Sands ( 1799-1832, Columbia 1815), Bryant close friend and collaborator in The Talisman, Tales of Glauber-Spa, and the Sketch Club, is reported to have died crying "Oh Bryant, Bryant." Life, I, 289. Since he was alone in the house with his mother and sister, with Bryant next door, this seems quite probable.

252. To Gulian C. Verplanck

New York Monday Dec 17 1832

Dear Sir,

I write in great haste to tell you of the death of our friend Sands. He had been engaged very assiduously on Sunday and the evening previous in preparing an article for Hoffman Magazine--the Knickerbocker. 1 Between four and five o'clock yesterday afternoon he complained of indisposition, and said he would go up stairs. He rose but soon fell to the floor and being helped to bed shortly fell into a state of stupor from which he did not recover and in about four hours from the attack died without a struggle. His mother and sister are in great grief. The funeral will take place tomorrow.

Yrs truly
W. C. BRYANT

MANUSCRIPT: NYPL-Berg ADDRESS: Hon. Gulian C. Verplanck / Member of Congress / Washington POSTMARK: NEW-YORK / DEC / 19 POSTAL ANNOTATION: FREE DOCKETED: W. C. Bryant.

1.
Sands article "Poetry of the Esquimaux" had been planned to accompany Bryant poem "The Arctic Lover." See Poems ( 1876), pp. 191-193. These were published with Bryant "Memoir of Robert C. Sands" in the Knickerbocker, I ( January 1833), 49-59. This was the first of many tributes to writers and artists of his acquaintance which Bryant composed over a period of forty years.

253. To Gulian C. Verplanck

New York Dec 19 1832

My dear Sir

Mr. Garcia has requested me to remind you of his petition about the chain cables. I am sorry to give you the trouble of reading another letter

-364-

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