The Letters of William Cullen Bryant - Vol. 1

By William Cullen Bryant II; Thomas G. Voss et al. | Go to book overview
1.
Letter unrecovered.
2.
That is, seven English pounds, or about $35 a month. Frances Bryant described these warm and comfortable lodgings at 700 Casa Genoni as close to the house once occupied by Lord Byron. "Autobiographical Sketch," NYPL-GR; letter to Eliza Robbins, December 10, 1834, Letter-book, Homestead Collection. Here at Pisa, in 1821- 1822, Byron had finished Don Juan.
3.
At one of these, a ball given by a Countess [Mastiani?], fourteen-year-old Fanny was "half beside herself at the honor of waltzing with a young nobleman beside the Grand Duke." Frances Bryant to her sister [Mina?], March? 1835, ibid.
4.
Probably Shepherd Knapp of Cummington, later treasurer of Brooklyn and president of the Mechanics Bank in that city. See S. F. White, "Hampshire County," in A History of New England, edd. R. H. Haval and H. E. Crocker ( Boston, 1880), p. 186.
5.
Late in 1834 Austin Bryant sold the Cummington homestead and farm to one Welcome Tillson. On May 11, 1835, he left with his wife and six children, his mother, and his sister Louisa, for Princeton, Illinois, by way of the Erie Canal, the Great Lakes, and Chicago. Bryant Record, pp. 41, 45; Amanda Matthews, "The Diary of a Poet's Mother," The Magazine of History, 2 ( September 1905), 208-209; George V. Bohman , "A Poet's Mother . . . ," Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society, 33 ( June 1940), 172.

299. To Horatio Greenough1

Pisa Feb. 27 1835.

My dear Sir.

I am greatly obliged to you for thinking of me, and for stealing time from the labours of your art to write to me. I will endeavour to answer your questions in their order. In the first place, it is my intention to return to Florence, after having seen Rome and Naples, which I shall set out to visit in about three weeks. In the second place, I have passed the winter quite pleasantly. We obtained commodious lodgings on the sunny side of the Arno, where we have made ourselves quite comfortable, and we have not been entirely without acquaintances. In the third place, as to my plans for the summer, I am not quite decided, though it is not improbable that I may cross the Alps in the course of the season, and plant myself in Germany to learn High Dutch. In the fourth place, Mrs. Bryant and the children are quite well. My wife thinks that the air or something else at Pisa agrees with her better than was the case at Florence. The seasort has been delightfully mild, serene and sunny, with little frost, as it seemed to me, though the people here called it rather colder than usual. The President's message I have seen in the papers forwarded to me regularly by the Havre packets. The Bank is down, as you say, --and the effect has been produced as much by the fortunate mismanagement of those who controlled that institution, as by the good sense of the nation. Had it not been for their purchasing presses and bribing members of Congress by pecuniary assistance, turning the bank into an electioneering engine, attempting to thwart the financial plans of government, setting their creatures to get up a panic and consequent distress, and various other ma

-439-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Letters of William Cullen Bryant - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 506

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.