The Letters of William Cullen Bryant - Vol. 1

By William Cullen Bryant II; Thomas G. Voss et al. | Go to book overview

ent case notwithstanding you gave battle to the Albany Argus rather roughly at first. 6

[unsigned]

Messrs Bryant Leggett & Co.
Gentlemen

Pay to William Leggett Esq. two hundred and sixty dollars and charge the same to my account. Rome April 15 1835.

MANUSCRIPT: NYPL-GR (draft) ADDRESS: To William Leggett Esq.

1.
Though it is not evident from the EP accounts, Bryant seems to have paid Leggett $500 for assuming his share of editorial work during the fiscal year ending May 16, 1835. The manuscripts containing the poems mentioned have not been recovered.
2.
Letter unrecovered.
3.
Bryant obviously meant to write "several weeks." Frances noted that they reached Rome on March 26, stayed a week at the Hôtel Frantz on the Via Condotta, and then took lodgings at 57 Via Pontifici, Palazzo Corca, where they "kept house as in Florence & Pisa," having their dinners sent in from a trattoria, "or cooks shop," for fifty cents a day. Frances Bryant, "Autobiographical Sketch.," NYPL-GR; letter to John Bryant, July 23, 1835, Letter-book, Homestead Collection.
4.
Earlier, Edwin Forrest had written from Paris, in an undated letter to NYM, "I shall probably meet with Bryant in Rome; and, in conversing with him of past scenes and distant friends, shall almost feel myself, for a time, restored to their society." NYM, 12 ( May 16, 1835), 365.
5.
Through the Brazilian minister to the Holy See, Frances and Fanny Bryant were given tickets to the "ceremonies of the Holy Week at the Vatican," where they saw Pope Gregory XVI celebrate High Mass in Saint Peter's. It is not clear, however, whether Cullen accompanied them. See F. Cicognani to Bryant, April 11, 1835, NYPL-GR; Frances to John Bryant, July 23, 1835, Letter-book, Homestead Collection.
6.
In November and December of 1834 Leggett had written half a dozen editorials setting forth the EP's firm opposition to monopolistic banking privileges for a favored few, whom he called variously the "scrip nobility," or the "would-be lordlings of the Paper Dynasty." See particularly "The Division of Parties," EP for November 4, 1834, and "Rich and Poor," EP for December 6, 1834. Both are reprinted in Leggett, Political Writings, 1, 64-68, 106-110.

302. To William Leggett

Florence June 12, 1835.

My dear Sir

I received a short time since at Naples your letter inclosing Welles & Fitch's receipt for the second remittance of $500. I thank you for this attention. From Rome some weeks ago I sent you the eighth poem for Morris with a draft in your favour on the office for $260, which I hope you have received before this time. Of course when the state of my funds in the concern will admit I should like a further remittance. There is the sum of $1000 to be paid for me to Mrs. Coleman on a bond in which

-446-

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