The Letters of William Cullen Bryant - Vol. 1

By William Cullen Bryant II; Thomas G. Voss et al. | Go to book overview

lion and three hundred thousand people he draws, by taxation, four millions of crowns annually, of which a million only is computed to be expended in the military and civil expenses of his government. The remainder is of course applied to keeping up the state of a prince and to the enriching of his family. He passes, you know, for one of the richest potentates in Europe.

[unsigned]

MANUSCRIPT: NYPL-GR (partial draft) TEXT: from draft manuscript and LT I, pp. 37-41.

1.
The Bryants left Rome by diligence on April 28, passing through Albano, Velletri, Cisterna, and Terracina, and reaching Naples on May 1. Here they lodged for three weeks at 267 Strada Chiaga. On May 26 they were back in Rome. After a week there and another at Florence, they left for Venice on June 16, spending four days en route through Bologna, Ferrara, and Padua, and on the 20th put up at the Albergo dell'Europa in Venice. Frances Bryant, "Autobiographical Sketch," NYPL-GR; letter to John Bryant, July 23, 1835, Letter-book, Homestead Collection.
2.
See the description of this climb in Letter 306.
3.
Here the draft manuscript ends, and the rest of the letter is taken from LT I, 37-41, there dated May 12 in error.
4.
Leopold Il ( 1797-1870) was Grand Duke of Tuscany from 1824 to 1859, when he was forced to abdicate in favor of his son, Ferdinand IV, deposed a year later when Tuscany united with Sardinia.
5.
Ferdinand 11 ( 1810-1859), King of Naples and Sicily from 1830 until his death, was, throughout most of his reign, an unrestrained tyrant.

303. To S[amuel?] D. Bradford1

Munich July 13, 1835.

My dear Sir

I got your letter yesterday. 2 We were all glad to hear from you and to learn that you got along with such good fortune--buying elegant carriages for a song, looking at the finest buildings and gazing on the most beautiful scenery of nature at one time and the grandest at another and being whirled over the intermediate distances with a swiftness to your heart's content, and without the nuisance of a travelling companion to interfere either with your tastes or your plans. We are sorry you did not follow your inclination to deviate a little from your course and take Munich in your way, that we might have heard a more particular description of what you have seen from your own mouth. You would have found Munich a pleasant, certainly a very clean and quite a growing city with some galleries of pictures worth seeing. Mr. Stanton came here the day after we did and stayed a week. 3 He had been at the coronation of the Emperor of Austria4 and was so pleased with the gaieties of Vienna that Munich seemed quite a dull place to him. He said that your arrival was much desired at Vienna, there being an American family there who would have been very glad to have offered you a place in their carriage to

-449-

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