Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria? And Other Conversations about Race

By Beverly Daniel Tatum | Go to book overview

Notes

Introduction
1.
J. H. Katz, White awareness: Handbook for anti-racism training ( Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1978).
2.
For more information about the Psychology of Racism course, see B. D. Tatum, "Talking about race, learning about racism: An application of racial identity development theory in the classroom," Harvard Educational Review 62, no. 1 ( 1992): 1-24.
3.
For a description of the professional development course for educators, see S. M. Lawrence and B. D.Tatum, "White educators as allies: Moving from awareness to action," pp. 333-42 in M. Fine, L. Weis, L. C. Powell, and L. M. Wong (Eds.), Off "White: Readings on race, power, and society ( New York: Routledge, 1997).
4.
B. D. Tatum, "Talking about race, learning about racism: An application of racial identity development theory in the classroom," Harvard Educational Review 62, no. 1 ( 1992): 1-24.

Chapter 1
1.
C. O'Toole, "The effect of the media and multicultural education on children's perceptions of Native Americans" (senior thesis, Department of Psychology and Education, Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley, MA, May 1990).
2.
For an extended discussion of this point, see David Wellman, Portraits of White racism ( Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1977), ch. 1.
3.
For specific statistical information, see R. Farley, "The common destiny of Blacks and Whites: Observations about the social and economic status of the races," pp. 197-233 in H. Hill and J. E. Jones Jr. (Eds.), Race in America: The struggle for equality ( Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1993).
4.
P. McIntosh, "White privilege: Unpacking the invisible knapsack," Peace and Freedom ( July / August 1989): 10-12.
5.
For further discussion of the concept of "belief in a just world," see M. J. Lerner , "Social psychology of justice and interpersonal attraction," in

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